audiogram

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au·di·o·gram

 (ô′dē-ə-grăm′)
n.
1. A graphic record of hearing ability for various sound frequencies that is used to measure hearing loss.
2. The procedure performed to produce such a record.

audiogram

(ˈɔːdɪəʊˌɡræm)
n
a graphic record of the acuity of hearing of a person obtained by means of an audiometer

au•di•o•gram

(ˈɔ di əˌgræm)

n.
the graphic record produced by an audiometer.
[1925–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.audiogram - a graphical representation of a person's auditory sensitivity to sound
representation - a creation that is a visual or tangible rendering of someone or something
Translations

au·di·o·gram

n. audiograma, instrumento para anotar la agudeza de la audición.

audiogram

n audiograma m
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References in periodicals archive ?
50 kHz); (3) flat (similar thresholds observed across the entire frequency range and the average hearing threshold not exceeding 80 dB HL); (4) profound (similar thresholds observed across the entire frequency range and the average hearing threshold over 80 dB HL); and (5) irregular type (any audiograms unqualified to be categorized into the above four types).
The mean durations from treatment until the final follow-up questionnaires and audiograms in the ANT and AIT groups were 75.
A total of 1987 audiograms of the patients reported at Audiology section, ENT Department were analysed.
Age related hearing loss is most common and it is difficult to differentiate occupational hearing loss from that caused by aging but thorough history and previous audiograms can help.
In chronological order, audiograms that were collected and analyzed include:
industry sectors using 1,413,789 noise-exposed worker audiograms from CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Occupational Hearing Loss Surveillance Project (4).
Companies across the state offer onboarding exams, functional capacity evaluations, drug and alcohol testing, and federally-mandated exams like respirator fit tests and audiograms.
Audiograms will be reviewed by a licensed industrial audiologist to flag "problem" audiograms and determine the need for further evaluation.
Audiograms are useful, particularly when serial tests are performed, to document the low frequency and fluctuating hearing loss over time.
5, 1,2 and 4 kHz were averaged, and 10 of the 27 audiograms were found to be greater than 20 dB HL.
Although the author of this section does provide examples of several audiograms, she does not discuss the auditory implications of those audiograms.
We propose the oncologist be provided a series of prediction audiograms using the planned cisplatin dosing regimen (dashed lines).