audiograph

audiograph

(ˈɔːdɪəʊˌɡrɑːf; -ˌɡræf)
n
a machine used to test a patient's hearing by transmitting sound waves directly to the inner ear
References in periodicals archive ?
I define an audiograph as a characterization technique that endows fictional bodies with a set of distinctive acoustic properties designed to position characters with regard to the ensemble of social facts and practices that constitute the fictional world they inhabit.
McTeague's audiograph, which includes his more narrowly linguistic deficiencies (stammering when excited, limited range of vocabulary, lower-class sociolect), thus contributes significantly to the process of "casting out the outcast," which June Howard has identified as a central concern of naturalist narratives.
The audiograph Howells furnishes the Dryfoos family with serves to reinforce their social distance from the Marches much the same way Lindau's immigrant speech serves to mark out his deviance from the novel's middle-class norm.
In A Hazard of New Fortunes, Howells uses audiographs to indicate the degree to which characters belong to certain social spheres.
The approach to support the technology-based learning of cognitively complex concepts is based on the following elements: record complete lessons using the AudioGraph tools; capture different streams of meta data and associate those both with and within the media elements; and describe the lesson content using the FSCL.
With the audiograph spread on the table before them, he pointed out that there was only one frequency band that he was unable to hear.
She told him in no uncertain terms how insulting his analysis of the audiograph was.
AudioGraph, which adds audio software support via an integrated kit of a microphone and audio board; plus Communique