audiotape

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au·di·o·tape

 (ô′dē-ō-tāp′)
n.
1. A magnetic tape used to record sound for subsequent playback.
2. A tape recording of sound.
tr.v. au·di·o·taped, au·di·o·tap·ing, au·di·o·tapes
To record (sound) on magnetic tape: audiotaped the interview for replay on radio.

audiotape

(ˈɔːdɪəʊteɪp) or

audio tape

n
magnetic tape used to record sound
vb (tr)
to make a sound recording of something

au•di•o•tape

(ˈɔ di oʊˌteɪp)

n.
magnetic tape on which sound is recorded.
[1960–65]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.audiotape - a tape recording of soundaudiotape - a tape recording of sound    
DAT, digital audiotape - a digital tape recording of sound
audio recording, sound recording, audio - a recording of acoustic signals
tape recording, taping, tape - a recording made on magnetic tape; "the several recordings were combined on a master tape"
2.audiotape - magnetic tape for use in recording soundaudiotape - magnetic tape for use in recording sound
mag tape, magnetic tape, tape - memory device consisting of a long thin plastic strip coated with iron oxide; used to record audio or video signals or to store computer information; "he took along a dozen tapes to record the interview"
Translations

audiotape

audio tape [ˈɔːdiəʊteɪp]
n
(= magnetic tape) → bande f audio inv
(US) (= cassette) → cassette f
vt (US)enregistrer sur cassette
an audiotaped recording of family members' discussions → un enregistrement sur cassette des discussions entre des membres de la famille
References in periodicals archive ?
But even after being briefed en masse by Greenspan, who characterized the audiotaping as "common knowledge" around the Fed, FOMC members did not admit they knew about the recordkeeping.
With the integrated digital record/playback capability, teachers can easily evaluate an individual student's instrumental or vocal performance, following the assessment strategy outlined in the National Standards for Music Education, which recommends audiotaping or videotaping students in grades 5-12 twice each semester.