augury


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

au·gu·ry

 (ô′gyə-rē)
n. pl. au·gu·ries
1. The art, ability, or practice of auguring; divination.
2. A sign of something coming; an omen: "The chartist buys when the auguries look favorable and sells on bad omens" (Burton G. Malkiel).

[Middle English augurie, from Old French, from Latin augurium, from augur, augur; see augur.]

augury

(ˈɔːɡjʊrɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. the art of or a rite conducted by an augur
2. a sign or portent; omen

au•gu•ry

(ˈɔ gyə ri)

n., pl. -ries.
1. the art or practice of divination from omens or signs.
2. an omen, token, or indication.
[1325–75; Middle English < Latin augurium=augur augur + -ium -ium1]
au′gu•ral, adj.

augury

1. the art of f oretelling the future by means of signs, originally by the flight of birds; divination.
2. an omen or portent from which the future is foretold. — augur, n.augurial, adj.augurous, adj.
See also: Divination
1. the art of foretelling the future by means of signs; divination.
2. an omen or portent from which the future is foretold. — augur, n.augurial, adj. — augurous. Obsolete, adj.
See also: Future

augury

Divination based mainly on the appearance and behavior of animals. Haruspicy is sometimes considered part of augury.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.augury - an event that is experienced as indicating important things to come; "he hoped it was an augury"; "it was a sign from God"
experience - an event as apprehended; "a surprising experience"; "that painful experience certainly got our attention"
war cloud - an ominous sign that war threatens
omen, portent, prognostic, prognostication, presage, prodigy - a sign of something about to happen; "he looked for an omen before going into battle"

augury

noun
A phenomenon that serves as a sign or warning of some future good or evil:
Idiom: writing on the wall.
Translations

augury

[ˈɔːgjʊrɪ] Naugurio m, presagio m
to take the auguries (archaic) → consultar los augurios

augury

[ˈɔːgjʊri] n (literary) (= omen) auguries of death → funestes augures mpl

augury

n (= sign)Anzeichen nt, → Omen nt
References in classic literature ?
Then a cry of vengeance burst at once, as it might be, from the united lips of the nation; a frightful augury of their ruthless intentions.
Then, also, the augury of ill-success, uttered from the sure wisdom of experience, fell upon her half-dead hope like a clod into a grave.
With these words he approached the cavern, and perceived that it was impossible to let himself down or effect an entrance except by sheer force or cleaving a passage; so drawing his sword he began to demolish and cut away the brambles at the mouth of the cave, at the noise of which a vast multitude of crows and choughs flew out of it so thick and so fast that they knocked Don Quixote down; and if he had been as much of a believer in augury as he was a Catholic Christian he would have taken it as a bad omen and declined to bury himself in such a place.
In turn I recalled each one I had seen, and tried to draw some augury of assistance from my memory.
de Treville, which proved to be in the Rue du Vieux-Colombier; that is to say, in the immediate vicinity of the chamber hired by D'Artagnan--a circumstance which appeared to furnish a happy augury for the success of his journey.
He was not bound, nor had they made any attempt to handcuff him; this seemed a good augury.
Chromis, and Ennomus the augur, led the Mysians, but his skill in augury availed not to save him from destruction, for he fell by the hand of the fleet descendant of Aeacus in the river, where he slew others also of the Trojans.
D'Artagnan, from being himself on all great occasions extremely concise, did not draw from the general's conciseness a favorable augury of the result of his mission.
I accept the augury, Monsieur d'Herblay; but nothing shall prevent me, nothing shall stop me.
The tribute paid by the President and his Cabinet to your work was none too high, and forms a most encouraging augury, I think, for the future prosperity of your institution.
It is, I fear, nothing more than a part of his general inaccuracy and indisposition to thoroughness of all kinds, which would be a bad augury for him in any profession, civil or sacred, even were he so far submissive to ordinary rule as to choose one.
At this good augury, and while shuffling the deck, he called to the barkeepers to set up the drinks for the house.