aurora


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Au·ro·ra 1

 (ə-rôr′ə)
n. Roman Mythology
The goddess of the dawn.

[Latin Aurōra; see aurora.]

Au·ro·ra 2

 (ə-rôr′ə)
1. A city of north-central Colorado, a residential suburb of Denver.
2. A city of northeast Illinois on the Fox River west of Chicago. It developed as an industrial center.

au·ro·ra

 (ə-rôr′ə)
n. pl. au·ro·ras or au·ro·rae (ə-rôr′ē)
1. A luminous atmospheric phenomenon appearing as streamers or bands of light sometimes visible in the night sky in northern or southern regions of the earth. It is thought to be caused by charged particles from the sun entering the earth's magnetic field and stimulating molecules in the atmosphere.
2. The dawn.

[Middle English, dawn, from Latin aurōra; see aus- in Indo-European roots.]

au·ro′ral, au·ro′re·an (-ē-ən) adj.
au·ro′ral·ly adv.

aurora

(ɔːˈrɔːrə)
n, pl -ras or -rae (-riː)
1. (Physical Geography) an atmospheric phenomenon consisting of bands, curtains, or streamers of light, usually green, red, or yellow, that move across the sky in polar regions. It is caused by collisions between air molecules and charged particles from the sun that are trapped in the earth's magnetic field
2. poetic the dawn
[C14: from Latin: dawn; see east]
auˈroral adj
auˈrorally adv

Aurora

(ɔːˈrɔːrə)
n
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) the Roman goddess of the dawn. Greek counterpart: Eos
2. the dawn or rise of something

Aurora

(ɔːˈrɔːrə)
n
(Placename) another name for Maewo

Au•ro•ra

(əˈrɔr ə, əˈroʊr ə)

n., pl. au•ro•ras, au•ro•rae (əˈrɔr i, əˈroʊr i)
1. the Roman goddess of the dawn.
2. (l.c.) dawn.
3. (l.c.) a radiant emission from the upper atmosphere that occurs as luminous streamers, bands, etc., caused when air molecules are excited by charged particles from the solar wind.
4. a city in central Colorado, near Denver. 252,341.
5. a city in NE Illinois. 116,405.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin: dawn, east]
au•ro′ral, au•ro′re•an, adj.

au·ro·ra

(ə-rôr′ə)
Plural auroras or aurorae (ə-rôr′ē)
A brilliant display of bands of light in the sky at night, especially in polar regions. The light is caused by charged particles from the sun that are drawn into the atmosphere by the Earth's magnetic field.

aurora

1. An electrical discharge producing curtains of light seen at high latitudes in the night sky.
2. The orthern and southern “polar lights” sometimes seen in Earth’s upper atmosphere and created by solar particles striking atoms.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aurora - the first light of dayaurora - the first light of day; "we got up before dawn"; "they talked until morning"
time of day, hour - clock time; "the hour is getting late"
2.aurora - an atmospheric phenomenon consisting of bands of light caused by charged solar particles following the earth's magnetic lines of forceaurora - an atmospheric phenomenon consisting of bands of light caused by charged solar particles following the earth's magnetic lines of force
atmospheric phenomenon - a physical phenomenon associated with the atmosphere
aurora australis, southern lights - the aurora of the southern hemisphere
aurora borealis, northern lights - the aurora of the northern hemisphere
streamer - light that streams; "streamers of flames"
3.Aurora - (Roman mythology) goddess of the dawn; counterpart of Greek Eos
Roman mythology - the mythology of the ancient Romans

aurora

noun
The first appearance of daylight in the morning:
References in classic literature ?
The mammoth grand-stand was clothed in flags, streamers, and rich tapestries, and packed with several acres of small-fry tributary kings, their suites, and the British aristocracy; with our own royal gang in the chief place, and each and every individual a flashing prism of gaudy silks and velvets -- well, I never saw anything to begin with it but a fight between an Upper Mississippi sunset and the aurora borealis.
I tell ye that when they got here they'd be jommlin' and jostlin' one another that way that it `ud be like a fight up on the ice in the old days, when we'd be at one another from daylight to dark, an' tryin' to tie up our cuts by the aurora borealis.
Towards midnight the sea suddenly resumed its usual colour; but behind us, even to the limits of the horizon, the sky reflected the whitened waves, and for a long time seemed impregnated with the vague glimmerings of an aurora borealis.
A part of the good abbe's words, however, were wholly incomprehensible to him; but, like the aurora which guides the navigator in northern latitudes, opened new vistas to the inquiring mind of the listener, and gave fantastic glimpses of new horizons, enabling him justly to estimate the delight an intellectual mind would have in following one so richly gifted as Faria along the heights of truth, where he was so much at home.
Aurora, throned in gold, carried off Cleitus for his beauty's sake, that he might dwell among the immortals, but Apollo made Polypheides the greatest seer in the whole world now that Amphiaraus was dead.
The Rue des Lombards had its share of the caresses of Aurora with the rosy fingers, and D'Artagnan arose like Aurora.
Any overheated motor may of course "seize" without warning; but so many complaints have reached us of accidents similar to yours while shooting the Aurora that we are inclined to believe with Lavalle that the upper strata of the Aurora Borealis are practically one big electric "leak," and that the paralysis of your engines was due to complete magnetization of all metallic parts.
This did not give him any authority, except now and then he could advise his friends to change their hunting-grounds; but Kotuko used it to domineer a little, in the lazy, fat Inuit fashion, over the other boys, when they came out at night to play ball in the moonlight, or to sing the Child's Song to the Aurora Borealis.
To a man of philosophic temperament like myself the blood-tick, with its lancet-like proboscis and its distending stomach, is as beautiful a work of Nature as the peacock or, for that matter, the aurora borealis.
They both spoke to the dingy dresser by name, calling him Parkinson, and asking for the lady as Miss Aurora Rome.
It was the aurora borealis of the frozen pole exiled to a summer land!
We sat in the aurora of a sunrise which was to put out all the stars.