auspice


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Related to auspice: auspicious

aus·pice

 (ô′spĭs)
n. pl. aus·pi·ces (ô′spĭ-sĭz, -sēz′)
1. also auspices Protection or support; patronage.
2. A sign indicative of future prospects; an omen: Auspices for the venture seemed favorable.
3. Observation of and divination from the actions of birds.

[Latin auspicium, bird divination, auspices, from auspex, auspic-, bird augur; see awi- in Indo-European roots.]

auspice

(ˈɔːspɪs)
n, pl -pices (-pɪsɪz)
1. (usually plural) patronage or guidance (esp in the phrase under the auspices of)
2. (often plural) a sign or omen, esp one that is favourable
[C16: from Latin auspicium augury from birds; see auspex]

aus•pice

(ˈɔ spɪs)

n., pl. aus•pic•es (ˈɔ spə sɪz)
1. Usu., auspices. patronage; support; sponsorship.
2. Often, auspices. a favorable sign or propitious circumstance.
3. a divination or prognostication, orig. from observing birds.
[1525–35; < French < Latin auspicium < auspex]

auspice

- Originally denoted the observation of bird flight as a form of divination.
See also related terms for observation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.auspice - a favorable omenauspice - a favorable omen      
omen, portent, prognostic, prognostication, presage, prodigy - a sign of something about to happen; "he looked for an omen before going into battle"

auspice

noun
Aid or support given by a patron.Often used in plural:
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Two girls, on the bills as sisters, came forth and sang a duet that is heard occasionally at concerts given under church auspices.
Although they might not have been personally concerned in the administration, and therefore not immediately agents in the measures to be examined, they would probably have been involved in the parties connected with these measures, and have been elected under their auspices.
Let, therefore, your illustrious house take up this charge with that courage and hope with which all just enterprises are undertaken, so that under its standard our native country may be ennobled, and under its auspices may be verified that saying of Petrarch:
According to the narrative of the German doctor, Ferdinand Werne, the expedition attempted in 1840, under the auspices of Mehemet Ali, stopped at Gondokoro, between the fourth and fifth parallels of north latitude.
But not content with this good deed, the indefatigable house again bestirred itself: Samuel and all his Sons --how many, their mother only knows --and under their immediate auspices, and partly, I think, at their expense, the British government was induced to send the sloop-of-war Rattler on a whaling voyage of discovery into the South Sea.
Who would be willing to stake his life and his estate upon the verdict of a jury acting under the auspices of judges who had predetermined his guilt?
The voyage was being accomplished under the most favourable auspices.
He was at once removed, under your auspices, and died a few days later, at one of your uncle's country houses, before he could make any statement.
Under the auspices of the three, the bottled ale and the Madeira were promptly disposed of; and when (the horses being once more put to) they resumed their seats, with the case-bottle full of the best substitute for milk-punch that could be procured on so short a notice, the key-bugle sounded, and the red flag waved, without the slightest opposition on Mr.
Halfacre commenced his compromises under favorable auspices.
In honour of the Marquess de Mendoza, then viceroy of Peru--under whose auspices the navigator sailed--he bestowed upon them the name which denoted the rank of his patron, and gave to the world on his return a vague and magnificent account of their beauty.
Under these unpromising auspices, the parting took place, and the journey began.