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auspice

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aus·pice  sps)
n. pl. aus·pi·ces sp-sz, -sz)
1. also auspices Protection or support; patronage.
2. A sign indicative of future prospects; an omen: Auspices for the venture seemed favorable.
3. Observation of and divination from the actions of birds.

[Latin auspicium, bird divination, auspices, from auspex, auspic-, bird augur; see awi- in Indo-European roots.]

auspice (ˈɔːspɪs)
n, pl -pices (-pɪsɪz)
1. (usually plural) patronage or guidance (esp in the phrase under the auspices of)
2. (often plural) a sign or omen, esp one that is favourable
[C16: from Latin auspicium augury from birds; see auspex]

aus•pice (ˈɔ spɪs)

n., pl. aus•pic•es (ˈɔ spə sɪz)
1. Usu., auspices. patronage; support; sponsorship.
2. Often, auspices. a favorable sign or propitious circumstance.
3. a divination or prognostication, orig. from observing birds.
[1525–35; < French < Latin auspicium < auspex]

auspice - Originally denoted the observation of bird flight as a form of divination.
See also related terms for observation.
Thesaurus Legend:  Synonyms Related Words Antonyms
Noun1.auspice - a favorable omenauspice - a favorable omen                    
omen, portent, prognostic, prognostication, presage, prodigy - a sign of something about to happen; "he looked for an omen before going into battle"


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But not content with this good deed, the indefatigable house again bestirred itself: Samuel and all his Sons --how many, their mother only knows --and under their immediate auspices, and partly, I think, at their expense, the British government was induced to send the sloop-of-war Rattler on a whaling voyage of discovery into the South Sea.
After much deliberation, however, he consented to make a trial; and ever since that period, he has acted as a lecturing agent, under the auspices either of the American or the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society.
Who would be willing to stake his life and his estate upon the verdict of a jury acting under the auspices of judges who had predetermined his guilt?
 
 
 
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