autarchy


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au·tar·chy 1

 (ô′tär′kē)
n. pl. au·tar·chies
1. Absolute rule or power; autocracy.
2. A country under such rule.

[From Greek autarkhos, self-governing, autarch : auto-, auto- + arkhos, ruler (from arkhein, to rule).]

au·tar′chic (-kĭk), au·tar′chi·cal (-kĭ-kəl) adj.

au·tar·chy 2

 (ô′tär′kē)
n.
Variant of autarky.

autarchy

(ˈɔːtɑːkɪ)
n, pl -chies
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) unlimited rule; autocracy
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) self-government; self-rule
[C17: from Greek autarkhia, from autarkhos autocratic; see auto-, -archy]
auˈtarchic, auˈtarchical adj

autarchy

(ˈɔːtɑːkɪ)
n, pl -chies
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a variant spelling (now rare) of autarky

au•tar•chy

(ˈɔ tɑr ki)

n., pl. -chies.
1. absolute sovereignty.
2. an autocratic government.
[1655–65; < Greek autarchía self-rule. See aut-, -archy]
au•tar′chic, au•tar′chi•cal, adj.
au′tar•chist, n.

autarchy

1. an absolute sovereignty.
2. an autocratic government.
3. autarky. — autarch, n.autarchie, autarchical, adj.
See also: Government

autarchy

A form of government in which one person has absolute and unlimited power.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.autarchy - economic independence as a national policy
independence, independency - freedom from control or influence of another or others
2.autarchy - a political system governed by a single individualautarchy - a political system governed by a single individual
monarchy - an autocracy governed by a monarch who usually inherits the authority
form of government, political system - the members of a social organization who are in power
dictatorship, monocracy, one-man rule, shogunate, Stalinism, totalitarianism, tyranny, authoritarianism, Caesarism, despotism, absolutism - a form of government in which the ruler is an absolute dictator (not restricted by a constitution or laws or opposition etc.)

autarchy

noun
A government in which a single leader or party exercises absolute control over all citizens and every aspect of their lives:
Translations

autarchy

[ˈɔːtɑːkɪ] Nautarquía f

autarchy

n
Selbstregierung f
References in periodicals archive ?
Achievement of autarchy is difficult, but not impossible.
As a major economy hoping to enter on a trajectory of fast economic growth, India needs to develop deep international links and supply chains, most immediately in its neighborhood, but the Belt and Road may well force it into new forms of economic isolation, this time involuntary, as opposed to the years of Indian economic autarchy.
Gregor asserts that autarchy as a substitution for primitive accumulation also occurred in Russia under both Lenin and Stalin, but, thanks to the Bolsheviks' abolishment of private property, this austere policy had much more drastic consequences for the Russian population than the Italian one.
They tried to explain it through two main dynamics, more often interlinked: the specificity of Oseni's transnational migration (2), or the supposed cultural autarchy, which would have preserved and transformed some archaic competitive practices up to the present (3).
He pointed out that an effective solution to it would be not autarchy, but openness both at the country level, by expanding opportunities for economic growth in Africa and the Near East (including reductions in trade barriers for products supplied by these countries to developed countries), and within developed economies towards migrants, by enhancing opportunities for their integration in the labour market and social institutions.
Similar timing in the opening of China and the release of Central and Eastern Europe from the constraints of Soviet planning and autarchy contributed to an especially rapid rise of the trade-income ratio at the end of the 20th century.
numerous children) and autarchy (Italian economic self-sufficiency)
But 12 years of arrogant autarchy under Nestor and Cristina Kirchner have just ended in Argentina.
South Africa was not able to and could never attain anything like economic autarchy, which only the very strongest actors in the international political economy might do.
In essence, this calls for autarchy in regard to essential commodities and for universal military service along Swiss lines, with no armed forces deployed overseas and the main land forces being trained to fight a guerrilla war.
AUTARCHY A Self-sufficiency B Absolute power C Bringing into being who am I?
Where Roosevelt steered the nation toward a seemingly inevitable war, Republican leaders largely accepted "Nazi dominance of Europe and its terms of trade, which depended on autarchy or self-sufficiency" (p.