autochthonal


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au·toch·tho·nous

 (ô-tŏk′thə-nəs) also au·toch·tho·nal (-thə-nəl) or au·toch·thon·ic (ô′tŏk-thŏn′ĭk)
adj.
1. Originating or formed in the place where found; indigenous: autochthonous rocks; an autochthonous people; autochthonous folk tales. See Synonyms at native.
2. Ecology Native to or produced within a system: an autochthonous species; algae that provide an autochthonous source of nutrients in a lake.

au·toch′thon·ism, au·toch′tho·ny n.
au·toch′tho·nous·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.autochthonal - originating where it is foundautochthonal - originating where it is found; "the autochthonal fauna of Australia includes the kangaroo"; "autochthonous rocks and people and folktales"; "endemic folkways"; "the Ainu are indigenous to the northernmost islands of Japan"
native - characteristic of or existing by virtue of geographic origin; "the native North American sugar maple"; "many native artists studied abroad"

autochthonal

adjective
Existing, born, or produced in a land or region:
References in periodicals archive ?
Fire Report--No Alarm And that I did not adhere to any man's God neither a comprehensible Absolute nor the inexplicable unseen breath of Omnipotent power --that I did indeed feel the awesome lack that in Heirophantic ardour is awesomely contained and not fall to my knees in abject piety or even for a failing moment give in to the warmth and secure of God-embracement --that I did not adhere to arcane trinities or bow to lettered ambiguity so that my soul be stencilled in wanton faith --that I stood amongst the brethren and aided the old and poor as well the young all for whom I did open the door like an act of Jesus Such be my metaphor Who with autochthonal spirit stands before the universe alone God-free father of my children and upon my finger the ring of poetry-- (Mindfield 234-235)
A position such as de Man's, or a casual attitude toward the responsibility of intellectuals to escape the determinations of their native tongue, risks complicity with such political and discursive essentialism; the view that divisive conflicts - say, between population groups in Northern Ireland, the former Yugoslavia, Rwanda, Sri Lanka or even urban North America - are non-negotiable expressions of autochthonal alterity, resistant to any sort of translation and therefore impervious to rational settlement, has a transparent ideological function.