autocidal

autocidal

(ˌɔːtəʊˈsaɪdəl)
adj
(Zoology) (of insect pest control) effected by the introduction of sterile or genetically altered individuals into the wild population
References in periodicals archive ?
Use of the CDC autocidal gravid ovitrap to control and prevent outbreaks of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae).
This autocidal pest control tactic requires the colonization and mass-rearing of the target pest species, the induction of sexual sterility in a large fraction of the insects by an appropriate dose of gamma radiation followed by their release into the field on a sustained basis and in sufficient numbers to achieve appropriate sterile to wild insect over-flooding ratios (Knipling 1979).
In this study, we used a modified autocidal ovitraps predetermined by GIS for surveillance of dengue mosquito vectors to determine high risk areas for dengue disease transmission.
albopictus of 2007-2008 in Cagayan de Oro City, the results showed that the exercise of using autocidal ovitrap and GIS in monitoring and controlling Ae.
But if larger numbers are required, as in mark-release-capture experiments or in autocidal control of mosquito populations, the previous approach is merely inappropriate.
In many applications of autocidal control, it would be efficient to separate the males and females before release (1).
Autocidal Control--A technique that is used primarily for insect control.
When I started genetic studies in 1967, I was looking for ways to manipulate the insect's reproduction or its behavior, hoping to make it a candidate for an autocidal or self-killing control method," says Alan C.
dagger]) Because conventional vector control approaches often fail to result in effective and sustainable prevention of infection with viruses transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes (5), and to improve surveillance of mosquito population densities, CDC developed an Autocidal Gravid Ovitrap (AGO) (6) to attract and capture the female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes responsible for transmission of infectious agents to humans (Figure).
An improved autocidal gravid ovitrap for the control and surveillance of Aedes aegypti.
In addition, proposed new autocidal techniques for tephritid control and eradication rely on temperature sensitivity in offspring (Handler 2002, 2004).
Autocidal strains that result in offspring death or sterility and also avoid radiation may be more effective (Alphey 2002).