autoinfection


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Related to autoinfection: hyperinfection, retroinfection

au·to·in·fec·tion

 (ô′tō-ĭn-fĕk′shən)
n.
Infection, such as recurrent boils, caused by bacteria, viruses, or parasites that persist on or in the body.

autoinfection

(ˌɔːtəʊɪnˈfɛkʃən)
n
(Pathology) infection by a pathogenic agent already within the body or infection transferred from one part of the body to another

au•to•in•fec•tion

(ˌɔ toʊ ɪnˈfɛk ʃən)

n.
infection caused by a pathogen that is already in one's own body.
[1900–05]
Translations

autoinfection

n (Med) → Autoinfektion f

au·to·in·fec·tion

n. autoinfección, infección causada por un agente del propio organismo.
References in periodicals archive ?
3] Hyperinfection denotes autoinfection with accelerated gastrointestinal and pulmonary symptoms.
2,4) The hyperinfection syndrome causes overwhelming infection in immunocompromised hosts as the parasite begins to replicate without leaving its host, through an accelerated autoinfection cycle.
autoinfection, (4) parthenogenesis and external phase of life cycle with a free living adult.
Thus, this parasite has unique ability to replicate and increase in number without leaving its host permitting ongoing cycles of autoinfection and can thus persist for decades without further exposure of the host to exogenous infective larvae.
This longevity of Strongyloides is related to its unique and complex life cycle with its alternation between free-living and parasitic cycles and the propensity for autoinfection and multiplication within the infected host [2].
3-5) Immunosuppression can lead to accelerated autoinfection and a large burden of migrating larvae in the body.
Such autoinfection can lead to widespread dissemination of the infection.
The plausible explanation for higher infestation might be because of exceptional development pathway called autoinfection in most of the helminths, which causes an increase in the number of adult worms inside the intestine.
Transmission typically occurs when larvae from stool-contaminated soil penetrate skin; intraintestinal autoinfection is also possible, sometimes allowing infection to persist for decades.
Strongyloides stercoralis can cause eosinophilia years after the initial infection because the organism is capable of autoinfection inside its host.
Moreover, the act of autoinfection allows it to infect the same host over and over with any intermediate host.
Strongyloides stercoralis is also capable of causing autoinfection in the host.