automatism


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au·tom·a·tism

 (ô-tŏm′ə-tĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. The state or quality of being automatic.
b. Automatic mechanical action.
2. Philosophy The theory that the body is a machine whose functions are accompanied but not controlled by consciousness.
3. Physiology
a. The involuntary functioning of an organ or other body structure that is not under conscious control, such as the beating of the heart or the dilation of the pupil of the eye.
b. The reflexive action of a body part.
4. Psychology Mechanical, seemingly aimless behavior characteristic of various mental disorders.

[From Latin automaton, automaton; see automaton.]

au·tom′a·tist n.

automatism

(ɔːˈtɒməˌtɪzəm)
n
1. the state or quality of being automatic; mechanical or involuntary action
2. (Law) law philosophy the explanation of an action, or of action in general, as determined by the physiological states of the individual, admissible in law as a defence when the physiological state is involuntary, as in sleepwalking
3. (Philosophy) law philosophy the explanation of an action, or of action in general, as determined by the physiological states of the individual, admissible in law as a defence when the physiological state is involuntary, as in sleepwalking
4. (Psychology) psychol the performance of actions, such as sleepwalking, without conscious knowledge or control
5. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the suspension of consciousness sought or achieved by certain artists and writers to allow free flow of uncensored thoughts
6. (Art Terms) the suspension of consciousness sought or achieved by certain artists and writers to allow free flow of uncensored thoughts
auˈtomatist n

au•tom•a•tism

(ɔˈtɒm əˌtɪz əm)

n.
1. the action or condition of being automatic; mechanical or involuntary action.
2. the theory that the activities of humans and animals are controlled by physical or physiological causes rather than by consciousness.
3. the involuntary functioning of an organic process, esp. muscular, without apparent neural stimulation.
4. Psychol. the performance of an act or actions without the performer's awareness or conscious volition.
5. an artistic technique in which the impulses of the unconscious mind are freed to guide the hand in producing images.
[1880–85; < Greek automatismós a happening of itself. See automaton, -ism]
au•tom′a•tist, n., adj.

automatism

an automatic or involuntary action. — automatist, n.
See also: Behavior
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.automatism - any reaction that occurs automatically without conscious thought or reflection (especially the undirected behavior seen in psychomotor epilepsy)
response, reaction - a bodily process occurring due to the effect of some antecedent stimulus or agent; "a bad reaction to the medicine"; "his responses have slowed with age"
Translations

automatism

[ɔːˈtɒmətɪzəm] Nautomatismo m

au·tom·a·tism

n. automatismo, conducta que no está bajo control voluntario.
References in periodicals archive ?
Often, forest fire fighters have to work in extreme conditions, make quick decisions on combating the elements, their actions should be worked out to automatism.
Automatism is a rarely used criminal defence and is defined as 'performance of actions without conscious thought or intention'.
I've spoke with an expert who suggested she might well be suffering from parosomnia - which is a catch-all phrase for the things people get up to when they're asleep - and possibly automatism.
I've spoken with an expert who suggested she might well be suffering from parosomnia - which is a catch-all phrase for the things people get up to when they're asleep - and possibly automatism.
As a team, the more the game went on the more we found each other and the more we had the automatism in the group.
Brodmann is a kind of abject expressionist, his paintings echoing the faux naivete of Tala Madani, the chromatic frenzy of Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, and the automatism of Andre Masson.
Contending "that the ultimate aim of Coleridgean education is to turn the working of free will into the automatism of habit" (2), Timar scrutinizes Coleridge's idea of the human by focusing on three concepts that seem to reveal the complex entanglements and potential material determinacy of the Coleridgean will.
Smart discusses Calzetta's early development in a way that probes deeper into the intent and meaning behind what appear to be simple, single-line drawings: "He practised a form of automatism -- automatic drawing -- that enabled him to put down in as immediate a way as possible his unconscious.
Loughnan to analyze a wide range of doctrines including infancy, unfitness to plead, automatism, infanticide, intoxication and diminished responsibility, as well as insanity.
His defence lawyers had also put forward an alternative defence that if the jury found that he did the killing, that he did it in the aftermath of an epileptic event, that he was labouring under an insane automatism.
The drawings of California based artist, Steve Smith are pure psychic automatism as defined by Andre Breton in the 1923 Manifesto of Surrealism, and closely relate to Taoist meditations on spontaneous, free expression.