automatism


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au·tom·a·tism

 (ô-tŏm′ə-tĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. The state or quality of being automatic.
b. Automatic mechanical action.
2. Philosophy The theory that the body is a machine whose functions are accompanied but not controlled by consciousness.
3. Physiology
a. The involuntary functioning of an organ or other body structure that is not under conscious control, such as the beating of the heart or the dilation of the pupil of the eye.
b. The reflexive action of a body part.
4. Psychology Mechanical, seemingly aimless behavior characteristic of various mental disorders.

[From Latin automaton, automaton; see automaton.]

au·tom′a·tist n.

automatism

(ɔːˈtɒməˌtɪzəm)
n
1. the state or quality of being automatic; mechanical or involuntary action
2. (Law) law philosophy the explanation of an action, or of action in general, as determined by the physiological states of the individual, admissible in law as a defence when the physiological state is involuntary, as in sleepwalking
3. (Philosophy) law philosophy the explanation of an action, or of action in general, as determined by the physiological states of the individual, admissible in law as a defence when the physiological state is involuntary, as in sleepwalking
4. (Psychology) psychol the performance of actions, such as sleepwalking, without conscious knowledge or control
5. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the suspension of consciousness sought or achieved by certain artists and writers to allow free flow of uncensored thoughts
6. (Art Terms) the suspension of consciousness sought or achieved by certain artists and writers to allow free flow of uncensored thoughts
auˈtomatist n

au•tom•a•tism

(ɔˈtɒm əˌtɪz əm)

n.
1. the action or condition of being automatic; mechanical or involuntary action.
2. the theory that the activities of humans and animals are controlled by physical or physiological causes rather than by consciousness.
3. the involuntary functioning of an organic process, esp. muscular, without apparent neural stimulation.
4. Psychol. the performance of an act or actions without the performer's awareness or conscious volition.
5. an artistic technique in which the impulses of the unconscious mind are freed to guide the hand in producing images.
[1880–85; < Greek automatismós a happening of itself. See automaton, -ism]
au•tom′a•tist, n., adj.

automatism

an automatic or involuntary action. — automatist, n.
See also: Behavior
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.automatism - any reaction that occurs automatically without conscious thought or reflection (especially the undirected behavior seen in psychomotor epilepsy)
response, reaction - a bodily process occurring due to the effect of some antecedent stimulus or agent; "a bad reaction to the medicine"; "his responses have slowed with age"
Translations

automatism

[ɔːˈtɒmətɪzəm] Nautomatismo m

au·tom·a·tism

n. automatismo, conducta que no está bajo control voluntario.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sutton said he was suffering from automatism - which left him physically but not mentally in control of his car - in the moments before the crash.
Myers called it the "co-conscious"; Janet called it "mental automatism," and James, prudently, called it nothing at all.
349) Automatism is defined "as connoting the state of a person who, though capable of action, is not conscious of what he is doing.
This same refusal to exploit emotion is behind his rejection of professional actors; he wanted to capture the automatism present in the unconscious gestures of his "models.
According to Hohne, the SS was a product of accident and automatism, dominated by idealistic criminals, place-seekers and romantics.
Or: "However, certainly language and ideology may coincide but there is no automatism between them" (sic, 336).
The expressive aspects of their work have been linked to the subjective heroism of earlier forms of Expressionism as well as to the Surrealist technique of automatism.
Clark briefly notes but never clarifies the root of the difference between the dispossession undergone in an original writer's "erruptive and inventive leap" and the heteronomy of the "uninteresting automatism of language (surrender to cliche, the trite phrase, the obvious rhyme)" (21).
According to modernist poet Andre Breton, Surrealism works as a "purely psychic automatism through which we undertake to express, in words, writing, or any other activity, the actual functioning of thought, thought dictated apart from any control by reason and any aesthetic or moral consideration.
It is important to note that there is no criminal law defence based on anger, although the existence of anger during the commission of the offence may be a consideration in some defences, such as automatism or provocation.
Early in the 20th century, Gertrude Stein conducted experiments on "normal motor automatism," the ability of the nervous system to operate without conscious control, including the act of writing.
These are dreaming, the automatism of the long distance truck driver, and blindsight.