auxesis


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aux·e·sis

 (ôg-zē′sĭs, ôk-sē′-)
n.
Growth resulting from increase in cell size without cell division.

[Greek auxēsis, growth, from auxanein, auxē-, to grow; see aug- in Indo-European roots.]

aux·et′ic (ôg-zĕt′ĭk) adj.
aux·et′i·cal·ly adv.

auxesis

(ɔːɡˈziːsɪs; ɔːkˈsiː-)
n
(Biology) growth in animal or plant tissues resulting from an increase in cell size without cell division
[C16: via Latin from Greek: increase, from auxein to increase, grow]

aux•e•sis

(ɔgˈzi sɪs, ɔkˈsi-)

n.
growth, esp. that resulting from an increase in cell size.
[1570–80; < Greek: increase, derivative of aúxein to increase; see -sis]
aux•et•ic (ɔgˈzɛt ɪk, ɔkˈsɛt-) adj.

auxesis

growth, especially owing to an increase in cell size. Cf. merisis.auxetic, adj.
See also: Biology
growth, especially owing to an increase in cell size. Cf. merisis. — auxetic, adj.
See also: Cells
growth, especially owing to an increase in cell size. Cf. merisis.auxetic, adj.
See also: Growth
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.auxesis - growth from increase in cell size without cell division
growing, growth, ontogenesis, ontogeny, maturation, development - (biology) the process of an individual organism growing organically; a purely biological unfolding of events involved in an organism changing gradually from a simple to a more complex level; "he proposed an indicator of osseous development in children"
References in periodicals archive ?
Here again we encounter auxesis climaxing with a battle in V heightened by two different uses of "deploy," one military (V.
por exceso o amplificacion, tambien denominada auxesis.
These narratives are connected with each other through the technique of amplification: in the first narrative Herodotus speaks only about tyranny, then he links the fall of tyranny with democracy and the increase of power of Athens and finally, in the third section, he further expands on all the previous topics: fall of tyranny, democracy, and auxesis of Athens.
Such auxesis is appropriate: augeri enim debent sententiae et insurgere (Quintilian, inst.
Here Gandalf starts with repetitive parallel clauses beginning with infinitives, an example of isocolon, which also seems to be auxesis, the arrangement of sentences in a climactic order.
AUXESIS is a hyperbolic term implying something appears greater than its actual size.
The linguistic satirist becomes more dominant in his later work, which relies in part on devices of amplification including auxesis, seriation, synathroesmus (adjectival seriation), and the tautology.