auxiliary verb


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Related to auxiliary verb: Modal auxiliary verb

auxiliary verb

Auxiliary verbs (also called helping verbs) are verbs that add functional meaning to other “main” or “full” verbs in a clause. They are used to create different tenses or aspects, to form negatives and interrogatives, or to add emphasis to a sentence. However, they do not have semantic meaning unto themselves.
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auxiliary verb

n. Abbr. aux. or aux. v.
A verb, such as have, can, or will, that accompanies the main verb in a clause and helps to make distinctions in mood, voice, aspect, and tense.

auxiliary verb

n
(Grammar) a verb used to indicate the tense, voice, mood, etc, of another verb where this is not indicated by inflection, such as English will in he will go, was in he was eating and he was eaten, do in I do like you, etc

auxil′iary verb′


n.
a verb used in construction with certain forms of other verbs, as infinitives or participles, to express distinctions of tense, aspect, mood, etc., as did in Did you go?, have in We have spoken, or can in They can see. Also called helping verb.
[1755–65]

auxiliary verb

A verb that accompanies and augments the meaning of a main verb, for example, “can” in “can do.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.auxiliary verb - a verb that combines with another verb in a verb phrase to help form tense, mood, voice, or condition of the verb it combines with
verb - the word class that serves as the predicate of a sentence
modal, modal auxiliary, modal auxiliary verb, modal verb - an auxiliary verb (such as `can' or `will') that is used to express modality
Translations
pomocné sloveso
apuverbi
segédige
hjálparsagnorðhjálparsögn
조동사
yardımcı fiil
References in classic literature ?
He - probably swayed by prudential consideration of the folly of offending a good tenant - relaxed a little in the laconic style of chipping off his pronouns and auxiliary verbs, and introduced what he supposed would be a subject of interest to me, - a discourse on the advantages and disadvantages of my present place of retirement.
An even less common construction is the so-called double perfect (see Krautmane 2010 : 56), which consists of the (j)i-form of the auxiliary verb, the past participle of the auxiliary verb, and the past participle of a lexical verb, as in Example 8 (KET 29):
Anderson's monograph is, to my knowledge, the most comprehensive study of inflectional patterns of auxiliary verb constructions to date.
The auxiliary verb "did" does not appear in the answer passage and it should be removed from the question string.
Transitivity implies the use of avere as auxiliary verb in compound tenses,4 but intransitivity does not exclusively imply essere as auxiliary verb.
The negative forms are used together with the suppletive negative auxiliary verb.
Various examples of auxiliary verb groups have not only been recorded from the literature, but also from daily conversations.
we find one token of the collocation eyes fixed from O'Connor's "Revelation" even though there is an auxiliary verb between the constituents of the collocation:
Language development and individual differences: a study of auxiliary verb learning: Cambridge University Press.
In the Spanish of the southwest United States, hacer (do) is used as an auxiliary verb with an English bare infinitive to form a bilingual periphrastic construction:
the way an auxiliary verb slides back & forth in a balanced sentence--a field of summer flowers, she absorbs & spills delight without stint.
When the idea you've put on the table takes the form of a verb, you can refer back to it with an auxiliary verb all by itself.