auxins


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Related to auxins: callus, Plant hormones, Cytokinins

auxins

A plant growth substance that occurs naturally and can be synthesized to control plant growth.
References in periodicals archive ?
The T-DNA oncogenes produce uncontrolled proliferation of crown gall cells via the production of auxins and cytokinins for the dividing plant cells and specific opines that are secreted as an energy source for the attached bacterium, but mainly for the surrounding aggregation of A.
The plant growth regulators market is segmented based on the type, namely: Cytokinins, Auxins, Gibberellins, Ethylene or Ethylene Releasers, Mepiquat Chloride and Others.
PPFMs influence seed germination and seedling growth by producing plant growth regulators, cytokinins, and auxins [4, 13, 19, 20, 21, 22 and 25] and altering agronomic traits like branching, vigor, rooting, and heat/cold tolerance [15 and 19].
The cytokinins interacting with the auxins promote cell division due to their role in cell cycle and participation in the mechanisms of cell lengthen and differentiation.
However all auxins were able to develop direct root with significant differences between the different auxins (p < 0.
have a substantial growth response to auxins (Keller and Van Volkenburgh, 1997, 1998).
Among the types of plant growth regulators such as auxins, cytokinins, gibberellins, and others, gibberellins accounted for the largest market share, followed by cytokinins and auxins.
Auxins are an important hormone in all plant growth and though they are present throughout the plant, they are concentrated in some parts.
The most biologically active and the most practical auxins are Naphthalene Acetic Acid (NAA) [3].
Olivia's Cloning Solution was the first ever liquid that combined both rooting auxins and nutrients in a safe, easy to use liquid for growers.
When auxins are present in the root, they act hand in hand with columel statoliths (which are sensitive to gravity), leading to positive geotropic growth (ALONI et al.
Eighty percent of microorganisms, including pseudomonads, isolated from the rhizosphere of various crops have the ability to produce auxins as secondary metabolites [15, 16].