avarice


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av·a·rice

 (ăv′ə-rĭs)
n.
Immoderate desire for wealth; cupidity.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin avāritia, from avārus, greedy, from avēre, to desire.]

avarice

(ˈævərɪs)
n
extreme greed for riches; cupidity
[C13: from Old French, from Latin avaritia, from avārus covetous, from avēre to crave]
ˌavaˈricious adj
ˌavaˈriciously adv
ˌavaˈriciousness n

av•a•rice

(ˈæv ər ɪs)

n.
insatiable greed for riches; inordinate, miserly desire to gain and hoard wealth.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Old French < Latin avāritia=avār(us) greedy + -itia -ice]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.avarice - reprehensible acquisitivenessavarice - reprehensible acquisitiveness; insatiable desire for wealth (personified as one of the deadly sins)
deadly sin, mortal sin - an unpardonable sin entailing a total loss of grace; "theologians list seven mortal sins"
2.avarice - extreme greed for material wealthavarice - extreme greed for material wealth  
greed - excessive desire to acquire or possess more (especially more material wealth) than one needs or deserves

avarice

noun greed, meanness, penny-pinching, parsimony, acquisitiveness, rapacity, cupidity, stinginess, covetousness, miserliness, greediness, niggardliness, graspingness, close-fistedness, penuriousness a month's rent - just enough to satisfy the landlord's avarice
generosity, extravagance, benevolence, unselfishness, liberality, bountifulness, largesse or largess
Quotations
"The love of money is the root of all evil" Bible: I Timothy
"avarice, the spur of industry" [David Hume Essays: Moral and Political]

avarice

noun
Excessive desire for more than one needs or deserves:
Informal: grabbiness.
Translations
طَمَع في جَمْع المال
lakomstvíchamtivosthrabivost
griskhed
ahneusrahanhimo
ágirnd, fégræîgi
強欲
gobšumasgobšus
mantrausībaskopums
hırspara ve zenginlik hırsı

avarice

[ˈævərɪs] Navaricia f

avarice

[ˈævərɪs] navarice f

avarice

nHabgier f, → Habsucht f

avarice

[ˈævərɪs] navarizia

avarice

(ˈӕvəris) noun
strong desire for money etc; greed.
ˌavaˈricious (-ʃəs) adjective
References in classic literature ?
At first it seemed as if the remembrance of the promised reward grew vivid in his mind, while he listened to the sources of parental feeling which were to assure its possession; but, as Duncan proceeded, the expression of joy became so fiercely malignant that it was impossible not to apprehend it proceeded from some passion more sinister than avarice.
I know he couldn't love a Linton; and yet he'd be quite capable of marrying your fortune and expectations: avarice is growing with him a besetting sin.
His face had not the harsh and rigid lines of later years; but it had begun to wear the signs of care and avarice.
A most remarkable circumstance is, that I really don't think he grasped this sum even so much for the gratification of his avarice, which was inordinate, as in the hatred he felt for Copperfield.
I had heard of her as leading a most unhappy life, and as being separated from her husband, who had used her with great cruelty, and who had become quite renowned as a compound of pride, avarice, brutality, and meanness.
see them carefully tended; let them not say in their pride, the Saxon churl has shown at once his poverty and his avarice.
Whether they were always so free from avarice, partialities, or want, that a bribe, or some other sinister view, could have no place among them?
But I would not believe, and, dazzled by the greed of avarice, I thought that if one eye could show me riches, the other might teach me how to get possession of them.
Our goods were no sooner landed than we were surrounded with a crowd of officers, all gaping for presents; we were forced to gratify their avarice by opening our bales, and distributing among them some pieces of calico.
Avarice and ambition had tuned their souls to that pitch of exaltation.
Ambition, avarice, personal animosity, party opposition, and many other motives not more laudable than these, are apt to operate as well upon those who support as those who oppose the right side of a question.
Mademoiselle valued it; she had used it for twelve years,--a fact to which she called attention with the triumphant joy of happy avarice.