averse


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a·verse

 (ə-vûrs′)
adj.
Having a feeling of opposition, distaste, or aversion; strongly disinclined: investors who are averse to taking risks.

[Latin āversus, past participle of āvertere, to turn away; see avert.]

a·verse′ly adv.
a·verse′ness n.

averse

(əˈvɜːs)
adj
1. (usually foll by: to) opposed, disinclined, or loath
2. (Botany) (of leaves, flowers, etc) turned away from the main stem. Compare adverse4
[C16: from Latin āversus, from āvertere to turn from, from vertere to turn]
aˈversely adv
aˈverseness n

a•verse

(əˈvɜrs)

adj.
having a strong feeling of opposition, antipathy, or repugnance; opposed.
[1590–1600; (< Middle French) < Latin āversus, past participle of āvertere to turn aside, avert]
a•verse′ly, adv.
a•verse′ness, n.
syn: See reluctant.
usage: See adverse.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.averse - (usually followed by `to') strongly opposedaverse - (usually followed by `to') strongly opposed; "antipathetic to new ideas"; "averse to taking risks"; "loath to go on such short notice"; "clearly indisposed to grant their request"
disinclined - unwilling because of mild dislike or disapproval; "disinclined to say anything to anybody"

averse

averse

adjective
Not inclined or willing to do or undertake:
Translations
كارِه لِ، مُبْغِض لِ
mající odpor
modvilliguvillig
idegenkedik
fráhverfur, frábitinn, mótfallinn
nemėgstantispasišlykštėjimas
negribīgs
hazzetmeyenhoşlanmayan

averse

[əˈvɜːs] ADJ to be averse to sthsentir repugnancia por algo
to be averse to doing sthser reacio a hacer algo
he is averse to getting up earlyes reacio a levantarse temprano
would you be averse to having the meeting at your house?¿estarías dispuesto a celebrar la reunión en tu casa?
I'm not averse to an occasional drinkno me opongo a tomar una copa de vez en cuando

averse

[əˈvɜːrs] adj
to be averse to sth → éprouver de la répugnance pour qch
to be averse to doing sth → éprouver de la répugnance à faire qch
not to be averse to sth
I wouldn't be averse to a drink → Je n'aurais rien contre un verre., Je ne dirais pas non à un petit verre.
He's not averse to a little publicity → Il n'a rien contre un peu de publicité.

averse

adj predabgeneigt; I am not averse to a glass of wineeinem Glas Wein bin ich nicht abgeneigt; I am rather averse to doing thates widerstrebt mir, das zu tun

averse

[əˈvɜːs] adj averse to (opposed) → contrario/a a; (disinclined) → restio/a a
to be averse to sth/doing sth → essere contrario/a a qc/a fare qc
I'm not averse to an occasional drink → non mi dispiace bere un bicchierino ogni tanto
I wouldn't be averse to a drink → non avrei nulla in contrario a bere qualcosa

averse

(əˈvəːs) adjective
(with to) having a dislike for. averse to hard work.
aˈversion (-ʃən) , ((American) — ʒən) noun
a feeling of dislike.
References in classic literature ?
But the captain, having some unusual reason for believing that rare good luck awaited him in those latitudes; and therefore being very averse to quit them, and the leak not being then considered at all dangerous, though, indeed, they could not find it after searching the hold as low down as was possible in rather heavy weather, the ship still continued her cruisings, the mariners working at the pumps at wide and easy intervals; but no good luck came; more days went by, and not only was the leak yet undiscovered, but it sensibly increased.
Since it was to cost nothing, we were not averse to using it, of course.
It is not saying too much: I know what I feel, and how averse are my inclinations to the bare thought of marriage.
I should not have been averse to do so, but that I imagined I detected trouble, and calculation relative to the extent of the cold meat, in Mrs.
The mother is a lady of some station, though not averse to increasing her income.
It was impossible to have lived with her fifteen years and not be aware that an unselfish clinging to the right, and a sincerity clear as the flower-born dew, were her main characteristics; indeed, Godfrey felt this so strongly, that his own more wavering nature, too averse to facing difficulty to be unvaryingly simple and truthful, was kept in a certain awe of this gentle wife who watched his looks with a yearning to obey them.
But there is still indeed a more weighty reason, why the kings of this country have been always averse from executing so terrible an action, unless upon the utmost necessity.
Sigurd was not averse to this, and asked his father where he thought it best to look for a wife.
Others, though content that treaties should be made in the mode proposed, are averse to their being the SUPREME laws of the land.
Among our still more modern and dashing young gentlemen -- who are extremely averse to superfluous effort and supremely indifferent to the purity of their native language -- the formula is still further curtailed by the use of "to feel" in a technical sense, meaning, "to recommend-for-the-purposes-of-feeling-and-being-felt"; and at this moment the "slang" of polite or fast society in the upper classes sanctions such a barbarism as "Mr.
Tarzan would not have been averse to this plan; but Lady Greystoke was horrified at the very thought of it.
Well, father was always averse to them,' sighed John.