aversion


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Related to aversion: aversion therapy

a·ver·sion

 (ə-vûr′zhən)
n.
1.
a. A fixed, intense dislike; repugnance: formed an aversion to crowds.
b. The cause or object of such a feeling: "I jumped up, and ran out of the room ... because a newspaper writer is my aversion" (Fanny Kemble).
2. The avoidance of a thing, situation, or behavior because it has been associated with an unpleasant or painful stimulus.
3. The act or fact of averting: the aversion of a disaster.

aversion

(əˈvɜːʃən)
n
1. (usually foll by: to or for) extreme dislike or disinclination; repugnance
2. a person or thing that arouses this: he is my pet aversion.

a•ver•sion

(əˈvɜr ʒən, -ʃən)

n.
1. a strong feeling of dislike, repugnance, or antipathy toward something and a desire to avoid it: an aversion to snakes.
2. a cause or object of such a feeling.
3. Obs. the act of turning away or preventing.
[1590–1600; < Latin āversiō]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aversion - a feeling of intense dislikeaversion - a feeling of intense dislike  
dislike - a feeling of aversion or antipathy; "my dislike of him was instinctive"
2.aversion - the act of turning yourself (or your gaze) awayaversion - the act of turning yourself (or your gaze) away; "averting her gaze meant that she was angry"
avoidance, shunning, turning away, dodging - deliberately avoiding; keeping away from or preventing from happening

aversion

hatred, hate, horror, disgust, hostility, opposition, dislike, reluctance, loathing, distaste, animosity, revulsion, antipathy, repulsion, abhorrence, disinclination, repugnance, odium, detestation, indisposition Many people have an aversion to insects.

aversion

noun
Translations
كَراهِيَّه، بُغْض شَديد
odporaverze
aversionmodvilje
óbeit
aversionmotvilja
nefrettiksinti

aversion

[əˈvɜːʃən]
A. N
1. (= dislike) → aversión f (to, for hacia) I have an aversion to garlic/cookingel ajo/la cocina me repugna, tengo aversión por el ajo/la cocina
I have an aversion to himme repugna, le tengo aversión
I took an aversion to itempezó a repugnarme
2. (= hated thing) → cosa f aborrecida
it is one of my aversionses una de las cosas que me repugnan
B. CPD aversion therapy Nterapia f por aversión, terapia f aversiva

aversion

[əˈvɜːrʃən] naversion f, répugnance f
aversion to doing sth → répugnance à faire qch
to have an aversion to sb/sth → avoir de l'aversion pour qn/qch

aversion

n
(= strong dislike)Abneigung f, → Aversion f (geh, Psych) → (to gegen); he has an aversion to getting weter hat eine Abscheu davor, nass zu werden
(= object of aversion)Gräuel m; smoking is his pet aversionRauchen ist ihm ein besonderer Gräuel

aversion

[əˈvɜːʃn] n (dislike) aversion (for or to)avversione f (per)
spiders are his aversion → ha la fobia dei ragni
my pet aversion → ciò che detesto di più
to have an aversion to sb/sth → avere or nutrire un'avversione nei confronti di qn/qc

averse

(əˈvəːs) adjective
(with to) having a dislike for. averse to hard work.
aˈversion (-ʃən) , ((American) — ʒən) noun
a feeling of dislike.

aversion

n. aversión, aborrecimiento, antipatía, odio;
___ therapyterapia de aversión.

aversion

n aversión f
References in classic literature ?
He never talked to her much, but he looked at her a good deal, and she felt sure that he did not regard her with aversion.
Some among them thought it was on account of her false hair, or the dread of getting the violets wet, while others attributed it to the natural aversion for water sometimes believed to accompany the artistic temperament.
The aversion (as it might justly be called) with which many persons regarded him was partly the result of his own character and deportment, and partly an inheritance.
The involuntary look of horror, fright and aversion, with which the girl regarded him, did not escape his eye.
For years my pet aversion had been the cuckoo clock; now here I was, at last, right in the creature's home; so wherever I went that distressing "HOO'hoo
Sid noticed that Tom never was coroner at one of these inquiries, though it had been his habit to take the lead in all new enterprises; he noticed, too, that Tom never acted as a witness -- and that was strange; and Sid did not overlook the fact that Tom even showed a marked aversion to these inquests, and always avoided them when he could.
All John Reed's violent tyrannies, all his sisters' proud indifference, all his mother's aversion, all the servants' partiality, turned up in my disturbed mind like a dark deposit in a turbid well.
Possibly, some people might suspect him of a degree of under-bred pride; I have a sympathetic chord within that tells me it is nothing of the sort: I know, by instinct, his reserve springs from an aversion to showy displays of feeling - to manifestations of mutual kindliness.
She passed the day and the evening in the parlor, vaguely conscious of a strange feeling of aversion to going back to her own room.
He knew very well, that in his horror of the deed which had culminated the bad deeds and bad reputation of the old family house, in his resentful suspicions of his uncle, and in the aversion with which his conscience regarded the crumbling fabric that he was supposed to uphold, he had acted imperfectly.
That old, double look was on me for a moment; and then his eyes darkened with a frown, as it turned, in its aversion, elsewhere.
She was looking at me then with a look of supreme aversion.