averter

averter

(əˈvɜːtə)
n
a person who averts or turns aside
References in classic literature ?
Nay, have we not the authority of Hesiod for affirming that when they are dead They are holy angels upon the earth, authors of good, averters of evil, the guardians of speech-gifted men?
While interviewing with a Nomadic ME [code G], it became evident that the in some cases owner of a well-run food shop could be risk averter.
Laura cherche-t-elle a seduire ou a averter une correspondante aupres de laquelle elle est peut-etre devenue une autre Carmilla?
The foundation for adverse selection is found in the concept of expected utility maximization where a risk averter expresses a preference for the less risky choice (Cutler & Zeckhauser, 1978; Rothschild & Stiglitz , 1970; 1976).
interpretation picks up his Greek title of Alexikakos, the averter of
Mais ces douze planches ne doivent servir que pour averter ceux qui navigueront de ces cOtes de prendre garde lorsqu'ils penseront qu'ils en approchent.
This does not mean that a risk averter will never bear risk.
Furthermore, the risk averter may engage in risk-taking activities.
Friedman and Savage propose a utility function that combines attitudes to risk (Friedman & Savage, 1948), in order to explain a comportment that is at first a risk seeker and next is risk averter and so on (figure 3).
However, agency theory explains that an employee, who usually is risk averse, would not take share of risk because a risk averter exerts less effort and performs less if risks are imposed on him or her (Milgrom & Roberts 1992).