avocation


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av·o·ca·tion

 (ăv′ō-kā′shən)
n.
An activity taken up in addition to one's regular work or profession, usually for enjoyment; a hobby.

[Latin āvocātiō, āvocātiōn-, diversion, from āvocātus, past participle of āvocāre, to call away : ā-, ab-, away; see ab-1 + vocāre, to call; see wekw- in Indo-European roots.]

av′o·ca′tion·al adj.
av′o·ca′tion·al·ly adv.

avocation

(ˌævəˈkeɪʃən)
n
1. formal a minor occupation undertaken as a diversion
2. not standard a person's regular job or vocation
[C17: from Latin āvocātiō a calling away, diversion from, from āvocāre to distract, from vocāre to call]

av•o•ca•tion

(ˌæv əˈkeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. something a person does in addition to a principal occupation, esp. for pleasure; hobby.
2. a person's regular occupation or calling; vocation.
3. Archaic. diversion or distraction.
[1520–30; < Latin āvocātiō distraction]
av`o•ca′tion•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.avocation - an auxiliary activityavocation - an auxiliary activity    
pastime, pursuit, interest - a diversion that occupies one's time and thoughts (usually pleasantly); "sailing is her favorite pastime"; "his main pastime is gambling"; "he counts reading among his interests"; "they criticized the boy for his limited pursuits"
spelaeology, speleology - the pastime of exploring caves
Translations

avocation

[ˌævəʊˈkeɪʃən] N (frm) (= minor occupation) → diversión f, distracción f; (= employment) → vocación f

avocation

n (form: = calling) → Berufung f
References in classic literature ?
The Brahmins maintain that in the almost endless sculptures of that immemorial pagoda, all the trades and pursuits, every conceivable avocation of man, were prefigured ages before any of them actually came into being.
Such an abounding, affectionate, friendly, loving feeling did this avocation beget; that at last I was continually squeezing their hands, and looking up into their eyes sentimentally; as much as to say, --Oh
It is not an avocation of a remunerative description - in other words, it does not pay - and some temporary embarrassments of a pecuniary nature have been the consequence.
It is impossible to keep the judges too distinct from every other avocation than that of expounding the laws.
Although Anna lived in good style--in far better style than might have been expected--her means and her avocation were conjectural.
There were many breaks in his education, caused by the migratory habits of his tribe, but even when removed from his books his active brain continued to search out the mysteries of his fascinating avocation.
Nor did he find Paris a whit less fertile field for his nocturnal avocation.
At any rate, my question had nothing to do with your other very interesting avocation.
Their fears were allayed and Tarzan now found himself often in the role of nursemaid to a tiny anthropoid-- an avocation which he found by no means irksome, since Gazan was a never-failing fount of surprises and entertainment.
But though she could neither sleep nor rest in her bed, yet, having no avocation from it, she was found there by her father at his return from Allworthy's, which was not till past ten o'clock in the morning.
And there I stood, shining my light and holding my phial with a keener interest than I had ever brought to any honest avocation.
Also, to record that wherever I have been, in the smallest places equally with the largest, I have been received with unsurpassable politeness, delicacy, sweet temper, hospitality, consideration, and with unsurpassable respect for the privacy daily enforced upon me by the nature of my avocation here and the state of my health.