awhile


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Related to awhile: a while ago

a·while

 (ə-wīl′, -hwīl′)
adv.
For a short time.
Usage Note: The adverb awhile and the noun phrase a while can lead to confusion because they sound the same and the noun phrase can function like an adverb. Noun phrases denoting time periods can often be used as adverbs, as one day in We'll move to Seattle one day. The same is true for a while. Thus Let's stop and rest a while is correct, since a while is here equivalent to "one day" in the previous phrase. Similarly, Let's stop and rest awhile is correct, where awhile functions as an adverb with a similar function to phrases like for an hour. · Care should be taken with prepositional phrases. Only a while can follow a preposition in a prepositional phrase, since only noun phrases can be the objects of prepositions. Thus I'll stay for a while is acceptable, but not I'll stay for awhile. (Note that if the preposition is dropped, both I'll stay a while and I'll stay awhile are acceptable, since the noun phrase a while can be used adverbially.)

awhile

(əˈwaɪl)
adv
for a brief period

a•while

(əˈʰwaɪl, əˈwaɪl)

adv.
for a short time or period: Stay awhile.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English āne hwīle (dat.); see a1, while]
usage: The adverb awhile is always spelled as one word: We rested awhile. The noun phrase a while is used, esp. in edited writing, when a preposition is expressed: We rested for a while. The one-word form, however, is appearing more frequently after a preposition: We rested for awhile.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.awhile - for a short timeawhile - for a short time; "sit down and stay awhile"; "they settled awhile in Virginia before moving West"; "the baby was quiet for a while"

awhile

adverb for a while, briefly, for a moment, for a short time, for a little while He worked awhile as a pharmacist.
Translations
لِفَتْرَة قَصيرَه
chvilku
lidt
egy kis ideig
stundarkorn
truputį
uz īsu brīdi
na chvíľku
birazkısa bir süre için

awhile

[əˈwaɪl] (esp US) ADVun rato, algún tiempo
not yet awhiletodavía no

awhile

[əˈhwaɪl] advun moment, quelque temps

awhile

adv (liter)eine Weile; not yet awhile!noch eine ganze Weile nicht!

awhile

[əˈwaɪl] adv(per) un po'

awhile

(əˈwail) adverb
for a short time. Wait awhile.

awhile

adv. por un rato, por algún tiempo;
to wait ___esperar un poco
References in classic literature ?
Like that immortal hero, she reposed awhile after the first attempt, which resulted in a tumble and the least lovely of the giant's treasures, if I remember rightly.
When grandmother was ready to go, I said I would like to stay up there in the garden awhile.
Then she turned and walked away; stopping to listen awhile to the music which La Petite was making.
the life is in his heart yet, and after he has slept awhile he will come to himself, and be a wiser man for it, till the hour of his real time shall come," returned Hawkeye, casting another oblique glance at the insensible body, while he filled his charger with admirable nicety.
I will sit in the parlor awhile, and collect my thoughts.
Hester bade little Pearl run down to the margin of the water, and play with the shells and tangled sea-weed, until she should have talked awhile with yonder gatherer of herbs.
By the time they have lounged up and down the promenade of the Equator awhile, they start for the Oriental waters in anticipation of the cool season there, and so evade the other excessive temperature of the year.
For awhile both men sat silent, and then Tom Green said in a low voice:
After Jurgis had been there awhile he would know that the plants were simply honeycombed with rottenness of that sort--the bosses grafted off the men, and they grafted off each other; and some day the superintendent would find out about the boss, and then he would graft off the boss.
We stood there awhile, in the thick darkness and stillness, looking toward the red blur in the distance, and trying to make out the meaning of a far-away murmur that rose and fell fitfully on the night.
I went in and saw the surgeon labor awhile, but could not enjoy; it was much less trying to see the wounds given and received than to see them mended; the stir and turmoil, and the music of the steel, were wanting here--one's nerves were wrung by this grisly spectacle, whilst the duel's compensating pleasurable thrill was lacking.
WELL, I got a good going-over in the morning from old Miss Watson on account of my clothes; but the widow she didn't scold, but only cleaned off the grease and clay, and looked so sorry that I thought I would behave awhile if I could.