axiom


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ax·i·om

 (ăk′sē-əm)
n.
1. A self-evident or universally recognized truth; a maxim: "It is an economic axiom as old as the hills that goods and services can be paid for only with goods and services" (Albert Jay Nock).
2. An established rule, principle, or law.
3. A self-evident principle or one that is accepted as true without proof as the basis for argument; a postulate.

[Middle English, from Old French axiome, from Latin axiōma, axiōmat-, from Greek, from axios, worthy; see ag- in Indo-European roots.]

axiom

(ˈæksɪəm)
n
1. (Mathematics) a generally accepted proposition or principle, sanctioned by experience; maxim
2. a universally established principle or law that is not a necessary truth: the axioms of politics.
3. (Logic) a self-evident statement
4. (Logic) logic maths a statement or formula that is stipulated to be true for the purpose of a chain of reasoning: the foundation of a formal deductive system. Compare assumption4
5. (Mathematics) logic maths a statement or formula that is stipulated to be true for the purpose of a chain of reasoning: the foundation of a formal deductive system. Compare assumption4
[C15: from Latin axiōma a principle, from Greek, from axioun to consider worthy, from axios worthy]

ax•i•om

(ˈæk si əm)

n.
1. a self-evident truth that requires no proof.
2. a universally accepted principle or rule.
3. a proposition in logic or mathematics that is assumed without proof for the sake of studying the consequences that follow from it.
[1475–85; < Latin axiōma < Greek: something worthy <axiō-, variant s. of axioûn to think worthy]

ax·i·om

(ăk′sē-əm)
A principle that is accepted as true without proof; a postulate.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.axiom - a saying that is widely accepted on its own merits
locution, saying, expression - a word or phrase that particular people use in particular situations; "pardon the expression"
aphorism, apophthegm, apothegm - a short pithy instructive saying
gnome - a short pithy saying expressing a general truth
moralism - a moral maxim
2.axiom - (logic) a proposition that is not susceptible of proof or disproof; its truth is assumed to be self-evident
Euclidean axiom, Euclid's axiom, Euclid's postulate - (mathematics) any of five axioms that are generally recognized as the basis for Euclidean geometry
logic - the branch of philosophy that analyzes inference
proposition - (logic) a statement that affirms or denies something and is either true or false

axiom

noun principle, fundamental, maxim, gnome, adage, postulate, dictum, precept, aphorism, truism, apophthegm the long-held axiom that education leads to higher income

axiom

noun
A broad and basic rule or truth:
Translations
بَديهِيّه، حَقيقَة مُقَرَّرَه
аксиома
axiom
aksiomgrundsætning
aksiomiperuslauseperusväiteperusväittämä
aksiom
alapigazságaxióma
lögmál, grundvallarregla
axioma
aksioma
aksioma, acīmredzama patiesība
axióma
aksiom
axiom
aksiyombelit

axiom

[ˈæksɪəm] Naxioma m

axiom

[ˈæksiəm] naxiome m

axiom

nAxiom nt

axiom

[ˈæksɪəm] nassioma m

axiom

(ˈӕksiəm) noun
a fact or statement which is definitely true and accepted as a principle or rule.
References in classic literature ?
He spoke simply, and utterly without emotion; with the manner of a teacher setting forth to a group of scholars an axiom in geometry, he would enunciate such propositions as made the hair of an ordinary person rise on end.
Indeed, it was an axiom with her that the cook can do no wrong; and a cook in a Southern kitchen finds abundance of heads and shoulders on which to lay off every sin and frailty, so as to maintain her own immaculateness entire.
But it is an axiom of democracy that no company, however well conducted, will be permitted to control a public convenience without being held strictly responsible for its own acts.
So far is the general sense of mankind from corresponding with the tenets of those who endeavor to lull asleep our apprehensions of discord and hostility between the States, in the event of disunion, that it has from long observation of the progress of society become a sort of axiom in politics, that vicinity or nearness of situation, constitutes nations natural enemies.
These two individuals proved the truth of that axiom by the opposing historic tints that were visible in their faces, in their conversation, in their ideas, and in their clothes.
We had laid it down as an axiom at the very outset, that in theory and practice there was no such piece of driveling nonsense in this world as a certificate of birth; that plenty of women were younger at forty than many a girl of twenty; and, to come to the point, that a woman is no older than she looks.
All this very plausible reasoning does not convince me, as it has not convinced the wisest of our Statesmen, that our ancestors erred in laying it down as an axiom of policy that the toleration of Irregularity is incompatible with the safety of the State.
In the jungle might is right, nor does it take long to inculcate this axiom in the mind of a jungle dweller, regardless of what his past training may have been.
From this view of things, then, comes the axiom that if you visit to discover the author of any bad action, seek first to discover the person to whom the perpetration of that bad action could be in any way advantageous.
And if there are some who think that a prince who conveys an impression of his wisdom is not so through his own ability, but through the good advisers that he has around him, beyond doubt they are deceived, because this is an axiom which never fails: that a prince who is not wise himself will never take good advice, unless by chance he has yielded his affairs entirely to one person who happens to be a very prudent man.
It is a military axiom not to advance uphill against the enemy, nor to oppose him when he comes downhill.
Besides, we are safe for to-day; you know the axiom, `Non bis in idem.