back up


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back 1

 (băk)
n.
1.
a. The part of the trunk of the human body along and to the sides of the spine between the neck and the pelvis; the dorsum.
b. The analogous dorsal region in other animals.
2. The backbone or spine.
3. The part or area farthest from the front.
4. The part opposite to or behind that adapted for view or use: the back of the hand; wrote on the back of the photograph.
5. The reverse side, as of a coin.
6. A part that supports or strengthens from the rear: the back of a couch.
7.
a. The part of a book where the pages are stitched or glued together into the binding.
b. The binding itself.
8. Sports
a. A player who takes a position behind the front line of other players in certain games, such as football and soccer.
b. In swimming, backstroke.
v. backed, back·ing, backs
v.tr.
1. To cause to move backward or in a reverse direction: Back the car up and then make the turn.
2. To furnish or strengthen with a back or backing.
3.
a. To provide with financial or material support: Unions backed the pro-labor candidate.
b. To lend moral support to, as by corroborating a claim. Often used with up: I'm not comfortable filing a complaint if you won't back me up.
c. To be in favor of; endorse or advocate: backed the reform proposal. See Synonyms at support.
4. To provide with musical accompaniment. Often used with up.
5. To bet or wager on.
6. To adduce evidence in support of; substantiate: backed the argument with facts.
7. To form the back or background of: Snowcapped mountains back the village.
v.intr.
1. To move backward: backed out of the garage.
2. To shift to a counterclockwise direction. Used of the wind.
adj.
1. Located or placed in the rear: Deliveries should be made at the back entrance.
2. Distant from a center of activity; remote.
3. Of a past date; not current: a back issue of a periodical.
4. Being owed or due from an earlier time; in arrears: back pay.
5. Being in a backward direction: a back step.
6. Linguistics Pronounced with the back of the tongue, as oo in cool. Used of vowels.
adv.
1. At, to, or toward the rear or back.
2. In, to, or toward a former location: went back for the class reunion.
3. In, to, or toward a former condition: When the spell broke, the prince turned back into a frog.
4. In, to, or toward a past time: This story goes back to the 1920s.
5. In reserve or concealment: We kept back some money for emergencies.
6. In check or under restraint: Barriers held the crowd back.
7. In reply or return: emailed back that he would be late.
Phrasal Verbs:
back away
To withdraw from a position; retreat.
back down
To withdraw from a position, opinion, or commitment.
back off
To retreat or draw away.
back out
1. To withdraw from something before completion.
2. To fail to keep a commitment or promise.
back up
1. To cause to accumulate or undergo accumulation: The accident backed the traffic up for blocks. Traffic backed up in the tunnel.
2. Computers To make a backup of (a program or file).
Idioms:
back and fill
1. Nautical To maneuver a vessel in a narrow channel by adjusting the sails so as to let the wind in and out of them in alteration.
2. To vacillate in one's actions or decisions.
back to back
Consecutively and without interruption: presented three speeches back to back.
behind (one's) back
In one's absence or without one's knowledge.
have got (someone's) back
To be prepared or ready to support or vouch for someone, as in a crisis.
have (one's) back up
To be angry or irritated.
off (someone's) back
No longer nagging or urging someone to do something.
on (someone's) back
Persistently nagging or urging someone to do something.

[Middle English bak, from Old English bæc.]

back′less adj.

back 2

 (băk)
n.
A shallow vat or tub used chiefly by brewers.

[Dutch bak, from French bac, from Old French, boat, from Vulgar Latin *baccus, vessel, probably of Celtic origin.]

back up

vb (adverb)
1. (tr) to support or assist
2. (Cricket) (intr) cricket (of a nonstriking batsman) to move down the wicket in readiness for a run as a ball is bowled
3. (of water) to accumulate
4. (of traffic) to become jammed behind an accident or other obstruction
5. (Computer Science) computing to make a copy of (a data file), esp for storage in another place as a security copy
6. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) printing to print the second side of (a sheet)
7. (usually foll by: on) Austral to repeat an action immediately
n
8. a support or reinforcement
9.
a. a reserve or substitute
b. (as modifier): backup troops.
10. (Pop Music)
a. musical accompaniment, esp for a pop singer
b. (as modifier): backup singer.
11. (Civil Engineering) the overflow from a blocked drain or pipe
12. (Computer Science) computing a file or set of files copied for security purposes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.back up - give moral or psychological support, aid, or courage toback up - give moral or psychological support, aid, or courage to; "She supported him during the illness"; "Her children always backed her up"
sponsor - assume responsibility for or leadership of; "The senator announced that he would sponsor the health care plan"
buy at, frequent, patronise, shop at, patronize, shop, sponsor - do one's shopping at; do business with; be a customer or client of
aid, assist, help - give help or assistance; be of service; "Everyone helped out during the earthquake"; "Can you help me carry this table?"; "She never helps around the house"
encourage, promote, further, boost, advance - contribute to the progress or growth of; "I am promoting the use of computers in the classroom"
undergird - lend moral support to
second, endorse, indorse, back - give support or one's approval to; "I'll second that motion"; "I can't back this plan"; "endorse a new project"
2.back up - move backwards from a certain position; "The bully had to back down"
draw back, move back, pull away, pull back, recede, retreat, withdraw, retire - pull back or move away or backward; "The enemy withdrew"; "The limo pulled away from the curb"
3.back up - establish as valid or genuineback up - establish as valid or genuine; "Can you back up your claims?"
affirm, confirm, corroborate, substantiate, support, sustain - establish or strengthen as with new evidence or facts; "his story confirmed my doubts"; "The evidence supports the defendant"
4.back up - make a copy of (a computer file) especially for storage in another place as a security copyback up - make a copy of (a computer file) especially for storage in another place as a security copy; "You'd better back up these files!"
re-create, copy - make a replica of; "copy that drawing"; "re-create a picture by Rembrandt"
5.back up - become or cause to become obstructedback up - become or cause to become obstructed; "The leaves clog our drains in the Fall"; "The water pipe is backed up"
gum up - stick together as if with gum; "the inside of the pipe has gummed up"
obturate, occlude, close up, impede, obstruct, jam, block - block passage through; "obstruct the path"
crap up - become obstructed or chocked up; "The drains clogged up"
choke up, lug, stuff, block - obstruct; "My nose is all stuffed"; "Her arteries are blocked"
silt, silt up - become chocked with silt; "The river silted up"
Translations
يَدْعَم، يُؤَيِّديُسَانِدُيَنْسَخُ نُسْخَةً داعِمـه
doložitpodepřítzálohovat
støttebakke oplave sikkerhedskopi
tukea
podržati
másolatot készít
styîja
支援する
(…)을 뒷받침하다
styrka
สนับสนุน
arka çıkmakdestek olmakdesteklemekyedeklemek
chứng minh

w>back up

vi
(car etc)zurücksetzen; to back up to somethingrückwärts an etw (acc)heranfahren
(traffic)sich stauen; (US: drain) → verstopfen
(Comput) → sichern
vt sep
(= support)unterstützen; (= confirm) storybestätigen; knowledgefundieren; claim, theoryuntermauern; he backed up the boy’s story that …er bestätigte den Bericht des Jungen, wonach …; he can back me up in thiser kann das bestätigen
car etczurückfahren
(Comput) → sichern, sicherstellen

back

(bӕk) noun
1. in man, the part of the body from the neck to the bottom of the spine. She lay on her back.
2. in animals, the upper part of the body. She put the saddle on the horse's back.
3. that part of anything opposite to or furthest from the front. the back of the house; She sat at the back of the hall.
4. in football, hockey etc a player who plays behind the forwards.
adjective
of or at the back. the back door.
adverb
1. to, or at, the place or person from which a person or thing came. I went back to the shop; He gave the car back to its owner.
2. away (from something); not near (something). Move back! Let the ambulance get to the injured man; Keep back from me or I'll hit you!
3. towards the back (of something). Sit back in your chair.
4. in return; in response to. When the teacher is scolding you, don't answer back.
5. to, or in, the past. Think back to your childhood.
verb
1. to (cause to) move backwards. He backed (his car) out of the garage.
2. to help or support. Will you back me against the others?
3. to bet or gamble on. I backed your horse to win.
ˈbacker noun
a person who supports someone or something, especially with money. the backer of the new theatre.
ˈbackbite verb
to criticize a person when he is not present.
ˈbackbiting noun
Constant backbiting by her colleagues led to her resignation.
ˈbackbone noun
1. the spine. the backbone of a fish.
2. the chief support. The older employees are the backbone of the industry.
ˈbackbreaking adjective
(of a task etc) very difficult or requiring very hard work. Digging the garden is a backbreaking job.
ˌbackˈdate verb
1. to put an earlier date on (a cheque etc). He should have paid his bill last month and so he has backdated the cheque.
2. to make payable from a date in the past. Our rise in pay was backdated to April.
ˌbackˈfire verb
1. (of a motor-car etc) to make a loud bang because of unburnt gases in the exhaust system. The car backfired.
2. (of a plan etc) to have unexpected results, often opposite to the intended results. His scheme backfired (on him), and he lost money.
ˈbackground noun
1. the space behind the principal or most important figures or objects of a picture etc. He always paints ships against a background of stormy skies; trees in the background of the picture.
2. happenings that go before, and help to explain, an event etc. the background to a situation.
3. a person's origins, education etc. She was ashamed of her humble background.
ˈbackhand noun
1. in tennis etc, a stroke or shot with the back of one's hand turned towards the ball. a clever backhand; His backhand is very strong.
2. writing with the letters sloping backwards. I can always recognize her backhand.
adverb
using backhand. She played the stroke backhand; She writes backhand.
ˈbacklog noun
a pile of uncompleted work etc which has collected. a backlog of orders because of the strike.
ˌback-ˈnumber noun
an out-of-date copy or issue of a magazine etc. He collects back-numbers of comic magazines.
ˈbackpack noun
(especially American) a bag that walkers, people who go on trips, or students carry on their backs.
ˈbackpacking: go backpacking
to go on trips or go camping carrying a backpack.
ˈbackpacker noun
ˈbackside noun
the bottom or buttocks. He sits on his backside all day long and does no work.
ˈbackslash noun
the sign (\).
ˈbackstroke noun
in swimming, a stroke made when lying on one's back in the water. The child is good at backstroke.
ˈbackup noun
1. additional people who provide help when it is needed. The police officer requested some backup when the shooting began.
2. a copy of a computer file that can be used in case the original is destroyed.
3. (also adjective) a piece of equipment, a system etc that can be used when there is a problem with the original one. a backup plan; We have a backup generator in case the power fails.
ˈbackwash noun
1. a backward current eg that following a ship's passage through the water. the backwash of the steamer.
2. the unintentional results of an action, situation etc. The backwash of that firm's financial troubles affected several other firms.
ˈbackwater noun
1. a stretch of river not in the main stream.
2. a place not affected by what is happening in the world outside. That village is rather a backwater.
ˌbackˈyard noun
(especially American) a garden at the back of a house etc. He grows vegetables in his backyard.
back down
to give up one's opinion, claim etc. She backed down in the face of strong opposition.
back of
(American) behind. He parked back of the store.
back on to
(of a building etc) to have its back next to (something). My house backs on to the racecourse.
back out
1. to move out backwards. He opened the garage door and backed (his car) out.
2. to withdraw from a promise etc. You promised to help – you mustn't back out now!
back up
1. to support or encourage. The new evidence backed up my arguments.
2. to make a copy of the information stored on the computer or disk.
have one's back to the wall
to be in a very difficult or desperate situation. He certainly has his back to the wall as he has lost his job and cannot find another one.
put someone's back up
to anger someone. He put my back up with his boasting.
take a back seat
to take an unimportant position. At these discussions he always takes a back seat and listens to others talking.

back up

يُسَانِدُ doložit støtte unterstützen υποστηρίζω respaldar tukea soutenir podržati avvalorare 支援する (…)을 뒷받침하다 ondersteunen støtte potwierdzić apoiar подтверждать styrka สนับสนุน destek olmak chứng minh 支持
References in classic literature ?
The man stared, and ran back up the one street of the village shouting for the priest, who was a big, fat man dressed in white, with a red and yellow mark on his forehead.
MORE than 200 people, including wheelchair-users, climbed Mount Snowdon yesterday to raise awareness of people who are paralysed, and the work of spinal cord injury charity Back Up.
Mr Callens said: "Our estimates suggest that Wales businesses could save PS2,500 a year over a three year period by switching to a cloud-based back up system and cutting down on wasted admin time.
These new units provide abundant battery back up power, allowing users to work through medium and extended power outages with runtimes of up to 136 minutes (BR1300LCD) and 154 minutes (BR1500LCD), depending on the units' load.