backbiting


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

back·bite

 (băk′bīt′)
v. back·bit (-bĭt′), back·bit·ten (-bĭt′n), back·bit·ing, back·bites
v.tr.
To speak spitefully or slanderously about (another).
v.intr.
To speak spitefully or slanderously about a person.

back′bit′er n.

backbiting

(ˈbækbaɪtɪŋ)
n
spiteful talk about an absent person
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Translations
إنتِقاد، اغتِياب
pomluva
bagtalelse
médisancetransfert intramoléculaire
fúrás
baknag, rógburîur
çekiştirme

backbiting

[ˈbækbaɪtɪŋ] Nmurmuración f

backbiting

[ˈbækbaɪtɪŋ] nmédisances fpl

backbiting

[ˈbækˌbaɪtɪŋ] nmaldicenze fpl

back

(bӕk) noun
1. in man, the part of the body from the neck to the bottom of the spine. She lay on her back.
2. in animals, the upper part of the body. She put the saddle on the horse's back.
3. that part of anything opposite to or furthest from the front. the back of the house; She sat at the back of the hall.
4. in football, hockey etc a player who plays behind the forwards.
adjective
of or at the back. the back door.
adverb
1. to, or at, the place or person from which a person or thing came. I went back to the shop; He gave the car back to its owner.
2. away (from something); not near (something). Move back! Let the ambulance get to the injured man; Keep back from me or I'll hit you!
3. towards the back (of something). Sit back in your chair.
4. in return; in response to. When the teacher is scolding you, don't answer back.
5. to, or in, the past. Think back to your childhood.
verb
1. to (cause to) move backwards. He backed (his car) out of the garage.
2. to help or support. Will you back me against the others?
3. to bet or gamble on. I backed your horse to win.
ˈbacker noun
a person who supports someone or something, especially with money. the backer of the new theatre.
ˈbackbite verb
to criticize a person when he is not present.
ˈbackbiting noun
Constant backbiting by her colleagues led to her resignation.
ˈbackbone noun
1. the spine. the backbone of a fish.
2. the chief support. The older employees are the backbone of the industry.
ˈbackbreaking adjective
(of a task etc) very difficult or requiring very hard work. Digging the garden is a backbreaking job.
ˌbackˈdate verb
1. to put an earlier date on (a cheque etc). He should have paid his bill last month and so he has backdated the cheque.
2. to make payable from a date in the past. Our rise in pay was backdated to April.
ˌbackˈfire verb
1. (of a motor-car etc) to make a loud bang because of unburnt gases in the exhaust system. The car backfired.
2. (of a plan etc) to have unexpected results, often opposite to the intended results. His scheme backfired (on him), and he lost money.
ˈbackground noun
1. the space behind the principal or most important figures or objects of a picture etc. He always paints ships against a background of stormy skies; trees in the background of the picture.
2. happenings that go before, and help to explain, an event etc. the background to a situation.
3. a person's origins, education etc. She was ashamed of her humble background.
ˈbackhand noun
1. in tennis etc, a stroke or shot with the back of one's hand turned towards the ball. a clever backhand; His backhand is very strong.
2. writing with the letters sloping backwards. I can always recognize her backhand.
adverb
using backhand. She played the stroke backhand; She writes backhand.
ˈbacklog noun
a pile of uncompleted work etc which has collected. a backlog of orders because of the strike.
ˌback-ˈnumber noun
an out-of-date copy or issue of a magazine etc. He collects back-numbers of comic magazines.
ˈbackpack noun
(especially American) a bag that walkers, people who go on trips, or students carry on their backs.
ˈbackpacking: go backpacking
to go on trips or go camping carrying a backpack.
ˈbackpacker noun
ˈbackside noun
the bottom or buttocks. He sits on his backside all day long and does no work.
ˈbackslash noun
the sign (\).
ˈbackstroke noun
in swimming, a stroke made when lying on one's back in the water. The child is good at backstroke.
ˈbackup noun
1. additional people who provide help when it is needed. The police officer requested some backup when the shooting began.
2. a copy of a computer file that can be used in case the original is destroyed.
3. (also adjective) a piece of equipment, a system etc that can be used when there is a problem with the original one. a backup plan; We have a backup generator in case the power fails.
ˈbackwash noun
1. a backward current eg that following a ship's passage through the water. the backwash of the steamer.
2. the unintentional results of an action, situation etc. The backwash of that firm's financial troubles affected several other firms.
ˈbackwater noun
1. a stretch of river not in the main stream.
2. a place not affected by what is happening in the world outside. That village is rather a backwater.
ˌbackˈyard noun
(especially American) a garden at the back of a house etc. He grows vegetables in his backyard.
back down
to give up one's opinion, claim etc. She backed down in the face of strong opposition.
back of
(American) behind. He parked back of the store.
back on to
(of a building etc) to have its back next to (something). My house backs on to the racecourse.
back out
1. to move out backwards. He opened the garage door and backed (his car) out.
2. to withdraw from a promise etc. You promised to help – you mustn't back out now!
back up
1. to support or encourage. The new evidence backed up my arguments.
2. to make a copy of the information stored on the computer or disk.
have one's back to the wall
to be in a very difficult or desperate situation. He certainly has his back to the wall as he has lost his job and cannot find another one.
put someone's back up
to anger someone. He put my back up with his boasting.
take a back seat
to take an unimportant position. At these discussions he always takes a back seat and listens to others talking.
References in classic literature ?
Very little open quarrelling ever took place amongst them; but backbiting and talebearing were universal.
They beguiled the time by backbiting and intriguing against each other in a foolish kind of way.
But if by virtue is meant (as I almost think it ought) a certain relative quality, which is always busying itself without-doors, and seems as much interested in pursuing the good of others as its own; I cannot so easily agree that this is the surest way to human happiness; because I am afraid we must then include poverty and contempt, with all the mischiefs which backbiting, envy, and ingratitude, can bring on mankind, in our idea of happiness; nay, sometimes perhaps we shall be obliged to wait upon the said happiness to a jail; since many by the above virtue have brought themselves thither.
Month by month, for a year past, conditions in the parish under him had been growing worse and worse; until it seemed that now, turn which way he would, he encountered only wrangling, backbiting, scandal, and jealousy.
I allays offer it along with the sherry, though sister Glegg will have it I'm so extravagant; and as for liking to have my clothes tidy, and not go a fright about the house, there's nobody in the parish can say anything against me in respect o' backbiting and making mischief, for I don't wish anybody any harm; and nobody loses by sending me a porkpie, for my pies are fit to show with the best o' my neighbors'; and the linen's so in order as if I was to die to-morrow I shouldn't be ashamed.
The people of this country are now demanding a clear debate about the implications - free from the political sniping and backbiting which reduced the last campaign to an incoherent farce.
Today, it's the turn of Cardiff's rivals Swansea to turn what should be a great celebration into a shameful excuse for backbiting and parochialism.
But council officials are wary of holding a civic reception, attended by dignitaries from Birmingham and the West Midlands, which they fear would be boycotted by disgruntled politicians and descend into undignified backbiting.
Macaulay also delves into the political backbiting that went into the creation of the Golden Gate Bridge.
And I fear all the politicking and backbiting at Anfield will ultimately disrupt the title charge.
Kennedy warned plotters their "splits, plots, rival camps, backbiting and leadership speculation" would not bring him down.
All I ever see on the television is National Assembly members backbiting and trying to score political points off each other.