backblocks

backblocks

(ˈbækˌblɒks)
pl n
Austral and NZ bush or remote farming area far distant from city amenities
ˈbackˌblock adj
ˈbackˌblocker n
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Picture Show Man (John Power, 1977) is a leisurely, episodic and picaresque portrait of the long-forgotten days of the travelling film exhibitors who traversed the backblocks of Australia in the 1920s and early 1930s.
Even in 1927, Alice Basten of the Auckland Mayoress's War Memorial Library League hoped people would help her address the "very pathetic appeals from the backblocks for medical works suitable for the instruction of housewives, and also for books, etc.
Three riders (Hin, Jo, and the unnamed female character who tells the story) are heading for a store in the utter backblocks of New Zealand; they are exhausted, their pack-horse is sick and they want to stop there for the night.
30) Four cases of typhoid fever from one family were the subject of a New Zealand backblocks hospital nurse's account in 1912.
Thomas wrote a booklet on first aid in the bush that was also recommended for use in the New Zealand backblocks (Kai Tiaki 1911).
10) The kind of itinerant horseback ministry conducted in the backblocks of the colony by priests like H.
The book presents the poems in categories such as December Days, Santa, Beach and Backblocks, Pets and Pests, Lazy Days, Sounds of Summer and Long Distant Blues, making it easy to access.
Individuals who would never have "gone it alone" as pure, self-seeking capitalists were prepared to attempt backblocks pioneering as members of "a band of brothers" undergirded by a sense of community, and by an awareness that there would be a pooling of talents and a group commitment to the common good.
In 1909, Kai Tiaki refers to Maori and backblocks nursing but reveals nothing to suggest that Maori nurses were seen as colleagues in the association.
BackBlocks are available for about pounds 30 but a cheaper homemade substitute is to lie over a five centimetre stack of books.
Lyne's performance in the 1897-98 Federal Convention sessions earned him Alfred Deakin's contempt: 'a crude, sleek, suspicious, blundering, short-sighted backblocks politician'.