backsight


Also found in: Encyclopedia.

backsight

(ˈbækˌsaɪt)
n
1. (Shooting) the sight of a rifle nearer the stock
2. (Surveying) surveying a reading taken looking backwards to a previously occupied station. Compare foresight4
References in periodicals archive ?
The rifle had a 3-leaf backsight and a brass blade foresight dovetailed into the barrel.
Still more interesting is that Thomas' attack on Siger and Tempier's attack on Averroists had had its pre-history which proves that the combat against Averroists had in fact its roots in the rift between Franciscan and Dominican views and that certain of Thomas's propositions (his clinging to creatio in theology and his concession to eternity in philosophy), together with their more or less supposed Averroism, had exactly been in the backsight of Franciscan friars (among these of Bonaventure) before the escalation of events in the 1270s (Gilson 2006:26-30).
Nowadays many scanners are equipped with total station-like functions such as centring over a known geodetic reference point, determining the instrument orientation to the backsight target or by calculating the position and the height of the instrument by resection.
The backsight of one Militiaman's rifle caught his eye.
t]--temperature corrections for backsight and foresight readings; [[delta].
Shortly after the Boer War, a British Major General named Sir Earnest Swinton, using the pseudonym Lieutenant Backsight Forethought, or BF, wrote The Defence of Duffer's Drift.
These problems cover all regularly encountered navigation situations, as well as those that are only occasionally used and often forgotten, such as backsight, shooting and unknown body, finding Venus in daylight, and storm avoidance.