backswing

back·swing

 (băk′swĭng′)
n.
The initial part of a stroke, in which one moves a racket or club, for instance, to the position from which forward motion begins.

backswing

(ˈbækswɪŋ)
n
the movement of a club, bat, or racket backwards, away from the intended point of contact, in preparation for making a stroke

back•swing

(ˈbækˌswɪŋ)

n.
the movement backward of a racket, bat, etc., preparatory to a forward stroke or swing.
[1895–1900]
Translations

backswing

[ˈbækˌswɪŋ] n (Tennis) → movimento di apertura
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References in periodicals archive ?
American Nicolas Paez, the third man in the last flight, claimed Tabuena hit a loose leaf on his backswing on a bunker on the par-3 No.
Make sure your left arm is at right angles to your spine as you complete your backswing.
Could Dusty Baker, the then-Nationals manager, have protested the umpires' decision involving a backswing interference call in the deciding Game 5 of the 2017 NLDS won by the Chicago Cubs, 9-8?
Go ahead and make a backswing and this will allow the right elbow to stay connected to the upper body.
A long time ago some guy kept telling me if I had a long backswing I would not grow up to be a professional.
I blacked out at the top of my backswing and then hit it in the middle of the fairway
A shorter backswing is typically safer but only up to a certain point.
Inbee Park takes the club back very slowly in the backswing, placing the club in an almost deliberate manner but accelerating sharply in the downswing creating impressive clubhead speed.
It can a result in insufficient wrist cock in the backswing.
He touched a loose reed on his backswing, called the referee over and accepted the penalty after the incident had been studied on television.
I have still not got full motion in either my backswing or follow through.