bad faith


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bad faith

n.
The malicious intention to be dishonest or to violate the law, as in negotiations over a contract.

[Translation of Latin mala fīdēs : mala, feminine singular of malus, bad + fīdēs, faith, honesty.]

bad faith

n
1. intention to deceive; treachery or dishonesty (esp in the phrase in bad faith)
2. (Philosophy) Also called: mauvaise foi (in the philosophy of the 20th-century French philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre) self-deception, as when an agent regards his actions as conditioned by circumstances or conventions in order to evade his own responsibility for choosing them freely
References in classic literature ?
May's blush remained permanently vivid: it seemed to have a significance beyond that implied by the recognition of Madame Olenska's social bad faith.
Do I realize solemnly enough how utterly and irretrievably this little womanly thing is the creature of my good or bad faith and fortune?
You accused us, perhaps, of inconstancy of bad faith.
The three other Kings, who were not paid for guarding the Passes, tell them by runner of the bad faith of Bunar and Hilas.
As highlighted by cases alleging a bad faith setup, policyholders and their representatives are often quite aware of their rights and obligations under a policy following a loss.
At the least Montana's Supreme Court recognized that its bad faith decisions had become the most extreme in the country.
Topics covered include: the insurer's third-party bad faith in refusing to settle; first-party bad faith in refusing to pay benefits; bad faith claims involving specific lines of insurance; common law claims; unfair claims settlement practices; alternative theories of liability, such as unjust enrichment; and more.
Believes Echo Entered Into December 2013 Agreement in Bad Faith and With No Intention of Performing Its Obligations
Chicago-Area Coke Managers Intimidate Workers, Engage in Bad Faith Bargaining During Ongoing Contract Negotiations
But can the insurer insulate itself from bad faith liability by forcing the insured to arbitrate his claim?
Economic reasoning predicts that policyholders in states that treat for insurer bad faith in settling claims as a tort should receive higher payments from insurers because of the greater potential damages insurers face in claims disputed in court.
In many states such practices, if proven in court, would support a claim of bad faith claims handling.