badgering


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badg·er

 (băj′ər)
n.
1. Any of several carnivorous burrowing mammals of the family Mustelidae, such as Meles meles of Eurasia or Taxidea taxus of North America, having short legs, long claws on the front feet, and a heavy grizzled coat.
2. The fur or hair of any of these mammals.
3. Any of several similar mammals, such as the ratel.
tr.v. badg·ered, badg·er·ing, badg·ers
To ask or nag (someone) about something in an annoying and persistent way; pester: badgered the boy into cleaning his room. See Synonyms at harass.

[Perhaps from badge.]
Word History: From an etymological point of view, the badger may simply be "the one that wears a badge." The Eurasian species of badger has a white head with a broad black stripe on each side of its snout, and the white area on its forehead may have brought to mind a badge, hence badger. This theory is supported by the fact that a common term for the badger in Middle and Early Modern English was bauson, which comes from the Old French word bausent, meaning "piebald, having a coat with black and white patches," and also "badger." The Old English word for the badger was broc, a word which survives in modern British English as brock, a word for the common badger, and also as the personal name Brock. Badger first appears in the early 16th century and eventually replaces brock and bauson in common usage.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.badgering - the act of harassing someonebadgering - the act of harassing someone  
harassment, molestation - the act of tormenting by continued persistent attacks and criticism
References in classic literature ?
It could not have been worse for you--and I suppose it was of you that he was thinking most while those infernal lawyers were badgering him in court.
Tracy Tupman, and Augustus Snodgrass, were severally called into the box; both corroborated the testimony of their unhappy friend; and each was driven to the verge of desperation by excessive badgering.
Inspired by this idea and the sentiments it awakened, sir, and feeling as a mutual friend that badgering, baiting, and bullying, was not the sort of thing calculated to expand the souls and promote the social harmony of the contending parties, I took upon myself to suggest a course which is THE course to be adopted to the present occasion.