badness


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bad 1

 (băd)
adj. worse (wûrs), worst (wûrst)
1. Not achieving an adequate standard; poor: a bad concert.
2. Immoral or evil.
3. Vulgar or obscene: bad language.
4. Disobedient or naughty: bad children.
5. Disagreeable, unpleasant, or disturbing: a bad piece of news.
6. Unfavorable: bad reviews for the play.
7. Not fresh; rotten or spoiled: bad meat.
8. Injurious in effect; detrimental: bad habits.
9. Not working properly; defective: a bad telephone connection.
10. Full of or exhibiting faults or errors: bad grammar.
11. Having no validity; void: passed bad checks.
12. Being so far behind in repayment as to be considered a loss: bad loans.
13. Severe; intense: a bad cold.
14.
a. Being in poor health or in pain: I feel bad today.
b. Being in poor condition; diseased: bad lungs.
15. Sorry; regretful: She feels bad about how she treated you.
16. bad·der, bad·dest Slang Very good; great.
n.
Something that is below standard or expectations, as of ethics or decency: weighing the good against the bad.
adv. Usage Problem
Badly.
Idioms:
in bad Informal
In trouble or disfavor.
my bad Slang
Used to acknowledge that one is at fault.
not half/so bad Informal
Reasonably good.
that's too bad
1. Used to express sadness or sympathy.
2. Used in response to a protest or complaint to express insistence that the speaker's expectation be met.

[Middle English badde, perhaps from shortening of Old English bæddel, hermaphrodite, effeminate or homosexual male.]

bad′ness n.
Usage Note: Bad is often used as an adverb in sentences such as His tooth ached so bad he could not sleep. This usage is common in informal speech but is widely regarded as unacceptable in formal writing. In our 2009 survey, 72 percent of the Usage Panel rejected the sentence just quoted. · The use of badly with want and need was once considered incorrect, since in these cases it means "very much" rather than "in an inferior manner or condition" or "immorally." But this use is widespread, even in formal contexts, and is now considered standard. · The adverb badly is often used after verbs such as feel, as in I felt badly about the whole affair. This usage bears analogy to the use of other adverbs with feel, such as strongly in We feel strongly about this issue. Some people prefer to maintain a distinction between feel badly and feel bad, restricting the former to emotional distress and using the latter to cover physical ailments; however, this distinction is not universally observed, so feel badly should be used in a context that makes its meaning clear. · Badly is used in some regions to mean "unwell," as in He was looking badly after the accident. Poorly is also used in this way. · Note that badly is required following look when it modifies another word or phrase in the predicate, as in The motorcycle looked badly in need of repair.
Our Living Language Many people might have the impression that the slang usage of bad to mean its opposite, "excellent," is a recent innovation of African American Vernacular English. While the usage is of African American origin and parallels to it are found in language use throughout the Caribbean, the "good" use of bad has been recorded for over a century. The first known example dates from 1897. Even earlier, beginning in the 1850s, the word appears in the sense "formidable, very tough," as applied to persons. Whether or not the two usages are related, they both illustrate a favorite creative device of informal and slang language—using a word to mean the opposite of what it "really" means. This is by no means uncommon; people use words sarcastically to mean the opposite of their actual meanings on a daily basis. What is more unusual is for such a usage to be generally accepted within a larger community. Perhaps when the concepts are as basic as "good" and "bad" this general acceptance is made easier. A similar instance is the word uptight, which in the 1960s enjoyed usage in the sense "excellent" alongside its now-current, negative meaning of "tense."

bad 2

 (băd)
v. Archaic
A past tense of bid.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.badness - that which is below standard or expectations as of ethics or decencybadness - that which is below standard or expectations as of ethics or decency; "take the bad with the good"
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
unworthiness - the quality or state of lacking merit or value
undesirability - the quality possessed by something that should be avoided
worse - something inferior in quality or condition or effect; "for better or for worse"; "accused of cheating and lying and worse"
evil - that which causes harm or destruction or misfortune; "the evil that men do lives after them; the good is oft interred with their bones"- Shakespeare
unsoundness - not mentally or physically healthy; "no one can be a poet without a certain unsoundness of mind"
liability - the quality of being something that holds you back
inadvisability - the quality of being ill-advised
goodness, good - that which is pleasing or valuable or useful; "weigh the good against the bad"; "among the highest goods of all are happiness and self-realization"
2.badness - used of the degree of something undesirable e.g. pain or weatherbadness - used of the degree of something undesirable e.g. pain or weather
intensiveness, intensity - high level or degree; the property of being intense
raininess, foulness - (of weather) the badness of the weather; "they were wearied with the foulness of the weather"
distressfulness, seriousness - the quality of arousing fear or distress; "he learned the seriousness of his illness"
3.badness - an attribute of mischievous childrenbadness - an attribute of mischievous children
disobedience - the trait of being unwilling to obey
prankishness, rascality, roguishness - the trait of indulging in disreputable pranks

badness

badness

noun
Whatever is destructive or harmful:
Translations
سوءٌ
špatná kvalitazkaženost
ondskab
rosszaság
illska, vonska

badness

[ˈbædnɪs] N
1. (= wickedness) → maldad f
2. (= poor quality) → mala calidad f

badness

[ˈbædnɪs] n [person] → méchanceté fbad-tempered [ˌbædˈtɛmpərd] adj
to be bad-tempered (by nature)avoir mauvais caractère
He's a really bad-tempered person → Il a vraiment mauvais caractère.; (in a bad mood)être de mauvaise humeur
He was really bad-tempered yesterday → Il était vraiment de mauvaise humeur hier.
to become bad-tempered → devenir irritable
When his headaches developed Nick became bad-tempered → Quand il avait mal à la tête, Nick devenait irritable.

badness

n no pl
Schlechtheit f; (moral) → Schlechtigkeit f; (= naughtiness)Unartigkeit f, → Ungezogenheit f
(= seriousness)Schwere f; (of headache)Stärke f

badness

[ˈbædnɪs] n (wickedness) → cattiveria

bad

(bӕd) comparative worse (wəːs) : superlative worst (wəːst) adjective
1. not good; not efficient. He is a bad driver; His eyesight is bad; They are bad at tennis (= they play tennis badly).
2. wicked; immoral. a bad man; He has done some bad things.
3. unpleasant. bad news.
4. rotten. This meat is bad.
5. causing harm or injury. Smoking is bad for your health.
6. (of a part of the body) painful, or in a weak state. She has a bad heart; I have a bad head (= headache) today.
7. unwell. I am feeling quite bad today.
8. serious or severe. a bad accident; a bad mistake.
9. (of a debt) not likely to be paid. The firm loses money every year from bad debts.
ˈbadlycomparative worse: superlative worst - adverb
1. not well, efficiently or satisfactorily. He plays tennis very badly.
2. to a serious or severe extent. He badly needs a haircut; The dress is badly stained.
ˈbadness noun
badly off
not having much especially money. We can't go on holiday – we are too badly off.
feel bad (about something)
to feel upset or ashamed about something. I feel bad about forgetting to telephone you.
go from bad to worse
to get into an even worse condition etc than before. Things are going from bad to worse for the firm – not only are we losing money but there's going to be a strike as well.
not bad
quite good. `Is she a good swimmer?' `She's not bad.'
too bad
unfortunate. It's too bad that he has left.
References in classic literature ?
Since the objects of imitation are men in action, and these men must be either of a higher or a lower type (for moral character mainly answers to these divisions, goodness and badness being the distinguishing marks of moral differences), it follows that we must represent men either as better than in real life, or as worse, or as they are.
His admiration was at first very strong, but no more than was natural, and I did not wonder at his being much struck by the gentleness and delicacy of her manners; but when he has mentioned her of late it has been in terms of more extraordinary praise; and yesterday he actually said that he could not be surprised at any effect produced on the heart of man by such loveliness and such abilities; and when I lamented, in reply, the badness of her disposition, he observed that whatever might have been her errors they were to be imputed to her neglected education and early marriage, and that she was altogether a wonderful woman.
The one knows and therefore speaks with authority about the goodness and badness of flutes, while the other, confiding in him, will do what he is told by him?
Balashev involuntarily flushed with pleasure at the aptitude of this reply, but hardly had he uttered the word Poltava before Caulaincourt began speaking of the badness of the road from Petersburg to Moscow and of his Petersburg reminiscences.
upon which the poor girl smiled, perhaps at the badness of the Latin, and, when her mistress cast her eyes on her, blushed, possibly with a consciousness of having laughed at her master.
Maud wondered, but looking at Voyt, "They're shown often, no doubt, as paying for their badness.
Still farther in confirmation of her hopes, in the interval of Marianne's turning from one lesson to another, some words of the Colonel's inevitably reached her ear, in which he seemed to be apologising for the badness of his house.
My father, who was deeply anxious to secure the friendship of so powerful a monarch, and held besides that a little travel would greatly improve my manners and open my mind, accepted gladly, and in a short time I had set out for India with the ambassador, attended only by a small suite on account of the length of the journey, and the badness of the roads.
They gave the two of them some wine out of a cask, to try, asking their opinion as to the condition, quality, goodness or badness of the wine.
Badness and goodness, again, are predicated of man, and of many other things, but it is not necessary that either the one quality or the other should be present in that of which they are predicated: it is not true to say that everything that may be good or bad must be either good or bad.
It was her public place: there she met her acquaintance, heard a little news, talked over the badness of the Portsmouth servants, and wound up her spirits for the six days ensuing.
You see," he continued, "I am not only bad, but I admire badness.