baffled

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baf·fle

 (băf′əl)
tr.v. baf·fled, baf·fling, baf·fles
1. To confuse or perplex, especially so as to frustrate or prevent from taking action: a patient whose condition baffled the physicians.
2. To impede the force or movement of (a fluid).
n.
1. A usually static device that regulates the flow of a fluid or light.
2. A partition that prevents interference between sound waves in a loudspeaker.

[Perhaps blend of Scottish Gaelic bauchle, to denounce, revile publicly, and French bafouer, to ridicule.]

baf′fle·ment n.
baf′fler n.

baffled

(ˈbæfəld)
adj
lacking in understanding: Police are baffled by the murder..
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.baffled - people who are frustrated and perplexedbaffled - people who are frustrated and perplexed; "the children's faces clearly expressed the frustration of the baffled"
people - (plural) any group of human beings (men or women or children) collectively; "old people"; "there were at least 200 people in the audience"
Adj.1.baffled - perplexed by many conflicting situations or statementsbaffled - perplexed by many conflicting situations or statements; filled with bewilderment; "obviously bemused by his questions"; "bewildered and confused"; "a cloudy and confounded philosopher"; "just a mixed-up kid"; "she felt lost on the first day of school"
perplexed - full of difficulty or confusion or bewilderment; "perplexed language"; "perplexed state of the world"
Translations
zmatený
forvirret
ymmällään
zbunjen
困惑した
당황한
förbryllad
ทำให้งงงวย
bối rối

baffled

[ˈbæfəld] adj (= puzzled) [person] → perplexe; [expression] → perplexe
I must admit, I'm completely baffled → Il faut l'admettre, ça me laisse vraiment perplexe.
to be baffled by sth → être dérouté(e) par qch

baffled

حَائِر zmatený forvirret verwirrt μπερδεμένος desconcertado ymmällään perplexe zbunjen perplesso 困惑した 당황한 verbijsterd forbauset bezradny confuso озадаченный förbryllad ทำให้งงงวย şaşkın bối rối 令人迷惑的
References in periodicals archive ?
Of course, one could claim that "love" has no place in this play, which, after all, pushes libertine comedy to its crudest extreme--except that the play itself reinforces such an ideal in its final moments: when (as we will examine in more detail below) Townley's bastard child appears on the scene in act 3, a humanistic note is also gently introduced, preparing for a final tableau in which Fossile stands baffledly but acceptantly "caress [ing]" the child in his arms (3.