bagpipe


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bag·pipe

 (băg′pīp′)
n. often bagpipes
A musical instrument having a flexible bag inflated either by a tube with valves or by bellows, a double-reed melody pipe, and from one to four drone pipes.

bag′pipe′ v.
bag′pip′er n.

bagpipe

(ˈbæɡˌpaɪp)
n
(Instruments) (modifier) of or relating to the bagpipes: a bagpipe maker.

bag•pipe

(ˈbægˌpaɪp)

n.
Often, bagpipes. a reed instrument consisting of a melody pipe and one or more accompanying drone pipes protruding from a bag into which air is blown by the mouth or a bellows.
[1300–50]
bag′pip`er, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bagpipe - a tubular wind instrumentbagpipe - a tubular wind instrument; the player blows air into a bag and squeezes it out through the drone
chanter, melody pipe - reed pipe with finger holes on which the melody is played
bourdon, drone pipe, drone - a pipe of the bagpipe that is tuned to produce a single continuous tone
musette, shepherd's pipe - a small bagpipe formerly popular in France
pipe - a tubular wind instrument
Translations
säkkipillisoittaa

bagpipe(s)

n(pl)Dudelsack m
References in classic literature ?
Give the lads a bagpipe instead of a rattle, and I'll answer for it the corn 'll be safe.
He was the usual cut and dry apothecary, of no particular age and colour, with a strong Edinburgh accent and about as emotional as a bagpipe.
Indeed, this deformed, unrecognizable object, reduced to nothing, was the body of Satellite, flattened like a bagpipe without wind, and ever mounting, mounting!
The notes of a Zamora bagpipe accompanied them, and with modesty in their countenances and in their eyes, and lightness in their feet, they looked the best dancers in the world.
So we hunted up the old stories, got a bagpipe, put on our plaids, and went in, heart and soul, for the glory of the Clan.
These books excited little Robert so much that if ever a recruiting sergeant came to his village, he would strut up and down in raptures after the drum and bagpipe, and long to be tall enough to be a soldier.
Its atmosphere was oppressive and disagreeable; it was crowded, noisy, and confusing; half the pupils dropped asleep, or fell into a state of waking stupefaction; the other half kept them in either condition by maintaining a monotonous droning noise, as if they were performing, out of time and tune, on a ruder sort of bagpipe.
A Fisher once took his bagpipes to the bank of a river, and played upon them with the hope of making the fish rise; but never a one put his nose out of the water.
I knew a young fellow once, who was studying to play the bagpipes, and you would be surprised at the amount of opposition he had to contend with.
Then, when they had eaten and drunk as much as they could, and when the day faded and the great moon arose, all red and round, over the spires and towers of Nottingham Town, they joined hands and danced around the fires, to the music of bagpipes and harps.
I remember, one morning, when Glumdalclitch had set me in a box upon a window, as she usually did in fair days to give me air(for I durst not venture to let the box be hung on a nail out of the window, as we do with cages in England), after I had lifted up one of my sashes, and sat down at my table to eat a piece of sweet cake for my breakfast, above twenty wasps, allured by the smell, came flying into the room, humming louder than the drones of as many bagpipes.
Being a great sleeper, and fond of his bed, it is possible he would have snoozed on until his usual hour of rising in the forenoon, in spite of all the drums, bugles, and bagpipes in the British army, but for an interruption, which did not come from George Osborne, who shared Jos's quarters with him, and was as usual occupied too much with his own affairs or with grief at parting with his wife, to think of taking leave of his slumbering brother-in-law--it was not George, we say, who interposed between Jos Sedley and sleep, but Captain Dobbin, who came and roused him up, insisting on shaking hands with him before his departure.