bags


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Related to bags: purses

bag

 (băg)
n.
1.
a. A container of flexible material, such as paper, plastic, or leather, that is used for carrying or storing items.
b. A handbag; a purse.
c. A piece of hand luggage, such as a suitcase or satchel.
d. A pouchlike or sagging organ or part of the body, such as a cow's udder.
2. An object that resembles a pouch.
3. Nautical The sagging or bulging part of a sail.
4. The amount that a bag can hold.
5. An amount of game taken or legally permitted to be taken.
6. Baseball A base.
7. Slang An area of interest or skill: Cooking is not my bag.
8. Slang A woman considered ugly or unkempt.
v. bagged, bag·ging, bags
v.tr.
1. To put into a bag: bag groceries.
2. To cause to bulge like a pouch.
3. To capture or kill as game: bagged six grouse.
4. Informal
a. To gain; acquire: He bagged a profit from the sale.
b. To capture or arrest: was bagged for trespassing.
c. To accomplish or achieve: bagged a birdie with a long putt.
5. Slang
a. To fail to attend purposely; skip: bagged classes for the day and went to the beach.
b. To stop doing or considering; abandon: bagged the idea and started from scratch.
c. To terminate the employment of.
v.intr.
1. To pack items in a bag.
2. To hang loosely: The pants bag at the knees.
3. To swell out; bulge.
Phrasal Verb:
bag out
To quit or abandon an activity.
Idioms:
bag and baggage
1. With all one's belongings.
2. To a complete degree; entirely.
bag it Slang
1. To cease participating in an activity: Finally in disgust I told my debating opponent to bag it.
2. To bring along one's lunch, as in a paper bag: I don't like cafeteria food, so I always bag it.
in the bag
Assured of a successful outcome; virtually accomplished or won.

[Middle English bagge, from Old Norse baggi.]

bag′ful n.
bag′ger n.

bags

(bæɡz)
pl n
1. informal a lot; a great deal
2. (Clothing & Fashion) short for Oxford bags
3. (Clothing & Fashion) informal Brit any pair of trousers
interj
4. children's slang Also: bags I Brit and Austral an indication of the desire to do, be, or have something
5. rough as bags rough as sacks Austral and NZ uncouth
Translations
fúra
References in classic literature ?
EVERY MAN, according to an ancient legend, is born into the world with two bags suspended from his neck all bag in front full of his neighbors' faults, and a large bag behind filled with his own faults.
You have not seen the pack-horse with the bags under the shed yonder?
In similar fashion he produced four other like bags, but smaller, from the four remaining hides and had several strips left over.
There were jam pots and paper bags, and mountains of chopped grass from the mowing machine
Pocket, Junior, delivering him the bags, One, Two, I saw the starting appearance come into his own eyes that I knew to be in mine, and he said, falling back:
The only person in sight was an elderly woman, sitting in a wagon with mail bags piled around her.
Hold on a minute, my servant 'll he'p you with them bags.
Magnus to make himself acquainted with the whole of the personal history of his fellow- travellers, and his loudly-expressed anxiety at every stage, respecting the safety and well-being of the two bags, the leather hat-box, and the brown-paper parcel.
Passepartout nearly dropped the bag, as if the twenty thousand pounds were in gold, and weighed him down.
So it was to take my bag that you asked me to release you
The Herd-boy returned to his sheep, and took off the invisible belt which he hid carefully in his bag.
About his neck hung a stout, bulging bag, which was buckled by a good piece of leather thong.