bags


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Related to bags: purses

bag

 (băg)
n.
1.
a. A container of flexible material, such as paper, plastic, or leather, that is used for carrying or storing items.
b. A handbag; a purse.
c. A piece of hand luggage, such as a suitcase or satchel.
d. A pouchlike or sagging organ or part of the body, such as a cow's udder.
2. An object that resembles a pouch.
3. Nautical The sagging or bulging part of a sail.
4. The amount that a bag can hold.
5. An amount of game taken or legally permitted to be taken.
6. Baseball A base.
7. Slang An area of interest or skill: Cooking is not my bag.
8. Slang A woman considered ugly or unkempt.
v. bagged, bag·ging, bags
v.tr.
1. To put into a bag: bag groceries.
2. To cause to bulge like a pouch.
3. To capture or kill as game: bagged six grouse.
4. Informal
a. To gain; acquire: He bagged a profit from the sale.
b. To capture or arrest: was bagged for trespassing.
c. To accomplish or achieve: bagged a birdie with a long putt.
5. Slang
a. To fail to attend purposely; skip: bagged classes for the day and went to the beach.
b. To stop doing or considering; abandon: bagged the idea and started from scratch.
c. To terminate the employment of.
v.intr.
1. To pack items in a bag.
2. To hang loosely: The pants bag at the knees.
3. To swell out; bulge.
Phrasal Verb:
bag out
To quit or abandon an activity.
Idioms:
bag and baggage
1. With all one's belongings.
2. To a complete degree; entirely.
bag it Slang
1. To cease participating in an activity: Finally in disgust I told my debating opponent to bag it.
2. To bring along one's lunch, as in a paper bag: I don't like cafeteria food, so I always bag it.
in the bag
Assured of a successful outcome; virtually accomplished or won.

[Middle English bagge, from Old Norse baggi.]

bag′ful n.
bag′ger n.

bags

(bæɡz)
pl n
1. informal a lot; a great deal
2. (Clothing & Fashion) short for Oxford bags
3. (Clothing & Fashion) informal Brit any pair of trousers
interj
4. children's slang Also: bags I Brit and Austral an indication of the desire to do, be, or have something
5. rough as bags rough as sacks Austral and NZ uncouth
Translations
fúra
References in classic literature ?
Nothing delighted you more than to have me tie my piece bags on your backs for burdens, give you hats and sticks and rolls of paper, and let you travel through the house from the cellar, which was the City of Destruction, up, up, to the housetop, where you had all the lovely things you could collect to make a Celestial City.
The distance was in reality over two miles, but Jurgis made two trips that night, each time with a huge pile of mattresses and bedding on his head, with bundles of clothing and bags and things tied up inside.
Finally, there must be some porters, to carry provisions, wine and scientific instruments, and also blanket bags for the party to sleep in.
I reckon I was right to think of fetching the little bags along.
Women are supposed to be very calm generally: but women feel just as men feel; they need exercise for their faculties, and a field for their efforts, as much as their brothers do; they suffer from too rigid a restraint, too absolute a stagnation, precisely as men would suffer; and it is narrow-minded in their more privileged fellow-creatures to say that they ought to confine themselves to making puddings and knitting stockings, to playing on the piano and embroidering bags.
There were pears and apples, clustered high in blooming pyramids; there were bunches of grapes, made, in the shopkeepers' benevolence to dangle from conspicuous hooks, that people's mouths might water gratis as they passed; there were piles of filberts, mossy and brown, recalling, in their fragrance, ancient walks among the woods, and pleasant shufflings ankle deep through withered leaves; there were Norfolk Biffins, squab and swarthy, setting off the yellow of the oranges and lemons, and, in the great compactness of their juicy persons, urgently entreating and beseeching to be carried home in paper bags and eaten after dinner.
Releasing one of her arms, she put it down in her pocket to the elbow, and brought out some paper bags of cakes which she crammed into my pockets, and a purse which she put into my hand, but not one word did she say.
He was a prosperous old bachelor, and his open window looked into a prosperous little garden and orchard, and there was a prosperous iron safe let into the wall at the side of his fireplace, and I did not doubt that heaps of his prosperity were put away in it in bags.
All was wild and solitary, and one might have declared it a scene untrodden by the foot of man, but for the telegraph posts and small piles of broken "macadam" at punctual intervals, and the ginger-beer bottles and paper bags of local confectioners that lent an air of civilisation to the road.
You, with a large landed estate, and bags of gold invested in railways, calling yourself a Social Democrat
There were jam pots and paper bags, and mountains of chopped grass from the mowing machine
You have not seen the pack-horse with the bags under the shed yonder?