bagwig

bag·wig

 (băg′wĭg′)
n.
A wig with the back hair encased in a small silk sack, worn in the 18th century.

bagwig

(ˈbæɡˌwɪɡ)
n
(Clothing & Fashion) an 18th-century wig with hair pushed back into a bag

bag•wig

(ˈbægˌwɪg)

n.
an 18th-century wig with the back hair enclosed in a fabric bag.
[1710–20]
References in classic literature ?
Not a whit less reticent and wooden was Mr Flintwinch outwardly, than in the usual course of things: the only perceptible difference in him being that the knot of cravat which was generally under his ear, had worked round to the back of his head: where it formed an ornamental appendage not unlike a bagwig, and gave him something of a courtly appearance.
Yes, he had seen the Right Honourable the Earl of Bagwig, his lordship's father; he was sure he had, he had met him at--at the Levee--didn't Dob remember?
Lords, commoners, and reverend bishops, with little distinction of person or party, were kicked and pinched and hustled; passed from hand to hand through various stages of ill-usage; and sent to their fellow-senators at last with their clothes hanging in ribands about them, their bagwigs torn off, themselves speechless and breathless, and their persons covered with the powder which had been cuffed and beaten out of their hair.