bailbond

bailbond

(ˈbeɪlˌbɒnd)
n
(Law) a document in which a prisoner and one or more sureties guarantee that the prisoner will attend the court hearing of the charge against him if he is released on bail
References in periodicals archive ?
On the argument that the said decision is an official act of the judicial department which this court is mandated to take judicial notice of without need for the introduction of evidence, the accused submits that thus court, irrespective of any and all other proceedings heretofore undertaken and/or of rulings made relative to the issue of bail, is now left with no other recourse but to apply the Valdez ruling, and should grant him bail forthwith pursuant to the latest Bailbond Guide and in accordance with the aforementioned Supreme Court decision, said chairperson Teresita Diaz-Baldoz, who penned the ruling.
262-68, or minorities may negotiate better rates with bailbond persons because they may be more likely to have lower search costs, AYRES, p.
Dailey, who had no prior criminal record, no income, and no benefits was held in custody with a bailbond set at $1.
He became active in the Democratic Party in Denver, ran a bailbond business, and became chairman of Denver's antipoverty program in the early 1960s.
The Tax Court also cancelled the bailbond paid by the young Napoles for her provisional liberty.
The arrest warrants carried a bailbond of P20,000 each.
When business was good the religious store could stomach the influx of pawn shops, adult entertainment stores, bailbonds shops, tattoo parlors and dozens of cheap clothing, shoe, jewelry and appliance stores up and down Van Nuys Boulevard.