bailiff


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bail·iff

 (bā′lĭf)
n.
1. A court attendant entrusted with duties such as the maintenance of order in a courtroom during a trial.
2. An official who assists a British sheriff and who has the power to execute writs, processes, and arrests.
3. Chiefly British An overseer of an estate; a steward.

[Middle English baillif, from Old French baillis, baillif-, overseer of an estate, steward, from Medieval Latin *bāiulīvus, from Latin bāiulus, carrier.]

bail′iff·ship′ n.

bailiff

(ˈbeɪlɪf)
n
1. (Professions) Brit the agent or steward of a landlord or landowner
2. (Professions) a sheriff's officer who serves writs and summonses, makes arrests, and ensures that the sentences of the court are carried out
3. (Law) chiefly Brit (formerly) a high official having judicial powers
4. (Professions) chiefly US an official having custody of prisoners appearing in court
[C13: from Old French baillif, from bail custody; see bail1]

bail•iff

(ˈbeɪ lɪf)

n.
1. an officer, similar to a sheriff, employed to keep order in the court, make arrests, etc.
2. (in Britain) a person charged with local administrative authority, or the chief magistrate in a town.
3. (esp. in Britain) an overseer of a landed estate or farm.
[1250–1300; Middle English baillif < Old French, derivative of bail custody; see bail1]
bail′iff•ship`, n.

bailiff

An official of a court, especially one who maintains order or is in charge of prisoners.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bailiff - an officer of the court who is employed to execute writs and processes and make arrests etc.bailiff - an officer of the court who is employed to execute writs and processes and make arrests etc.
functionary, official - a worker who holds or is invested with an office
Translations
ammanbaljuwdrossaarddrostgerechtsdeurwaarder

bailiff

[ˈbeɪlɪf] N
1. (Jur) → alguacil m
2. (on estate) → administrador(a) m/f

bailiff

[ˈbeɪlɪf] n
(in law court)huissier/ière m/f; (for evictions)huissier/ière m/f
to send in the bailiffs → envoyer l'huissier

bailiff

n
(Jur) (Brit: also sheriff’s bailiff) → Amtsdiener(in) m(f); (Brit: for property) → Gerichtsvollzieher(in) m(f); (US: in court) → Gerichtsdiener(in) m(f)
(Brit: on estate) → (Guts)verwalter(in) m(f), → Landvogt(in) m(f) (obs)

bailiff

[ˈbeɪlɪf] n (Law) → ufficiale m giudiziario; (on estate) → amministratore m, fattore m
References in classic literature ?
How wildly it heightens the effect of that passage in Froissart, when, masked in the snowy symbol of their faction, the desperate White Hoods of Ghent murder their bailiff in the market-place
I am only a farm bailiff, it is true; but I am not poor, nevertheless.
Graham's intending to have a bailiff from Scotland, to look after his new estate.
Cruncher stood at his side, and touched him on the shoulder like a ghostly bailiff.
One was Monsieur du Coudrai, the recorder of mortgages; the other Monsieur Choisnel, former bailiff to the house of Esgrignon, and now the notary of the upper aristocracy, by whom he was received with a distinction due to his virtues; he was also a man of considerable wealth.
They had all had their word of pity for poor Thias, but now they had got upon the nearer subject of their own grievances against Satchell, the Squire's bailiff, who played the part of steward so far as it was not performed by old Mr.
Grant's bailiff, I believe I had better keep out of his way; and my brother-in-law himself, who is all kindness in general, looked rather black upon me when he found what I had been at.
We can find out from his bailiff, sir, but"--with cold contempt--"I think that trained nurse is just comin' up from her dinner, so 'm afraid we'll 'ave to ask you, sir .
He had given instructions to his bailiff to send the postillion carriage on to Southampton, to be ready for their journey home, and to arrange for relays of his own horses to be sent on at once.
It was more, far more; a country-house built for enjoyment pure and simple, with not an acre of troublesome land attached to it beyond what was required for residential purposes, and for a little fancy farm kept in hand by the owner, and tended by a bailiff.
We do not sigh over dead dicky-birds with the bailiff in the house, and when we do not know where on earth to get our next shilling from, we do not worry as to whether our mistress' smiles are cold, or hot, or lukewarm, or anything else about them.
Coavinses has been arrested by the Great Bailiff," said Mr.