bailiff

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bail·iff

 (bā′lĭf)
n.
1. A court attendant entrusted with duties such as the maintenance of order in a courtroom during a trial.
2. An official who assists a British sheriff and who has the power to execute writs, processes, and arrests.
3. Chiefly British An overseer of an estate; a steward.

[Middle English baillif, from Old French baillis, baillif-, overseer of an estate, steward, from Medieval Latin *bāiulīvus, from Latin bāiulus, carrier.]

bail′iff·ship′ n.

bailiff

(ˈbeɪlɪf)
n
1. (Professions) Brit the agent or steward of a landlord or landowner
2. (Professions) a sheriff's officer who serves writs and summonses, makes arrests, and ensures that the sentences of the court are carried out
3. (Law) chiefly Brit (formerly) a high official having judicial powers
4. (Professions) chiefly US an official having custody of prisoners appearing in court
[C13: from Old French baillif, from bail custody; see bail1]

bail•iff

(ˈbeɪ lɪf)

n.
1. an officer, similar to a sheriff, employed to keep order in the court, make arrests, etc.
2. (in Britain) a person charged with local administrative authority, or the chief magistrate in a town.
3. (esp. in Britain) an overseer of a landed estate or farm.
[1250–1300; Middle English baillif < Old French, derivative of bail custody; see bail1]
bail′iff•ship`, n.

bailiff

An official of a court, especially one who maintains order or is in charge of prisoners.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bailiff - an officer of the court who is employed to execute writs and processes and make arrests etc.bailiff - an officer of the court who is employed to execute writs and processes and make arrests etc.
functionary, official - a worker who holds or is invested with an office
Translations
ammanbaljuwdrossaarddrostgerechtsdeurwaarder

bailiff

[ˈbeɪlɪf] N
1. (Jur) → alguacil m
2. (on estate) → administrador(a) m/f

bailiff

[ˈbeɪlɪf] n
(in law court)huissier/ière m/f; (for evictions)huissier/ière m/f
to send in the bailiffs → envoyer l'huissier

bailiff

n
(Jur) (Brit: also sheriff’s bailiff) → Amtsdiener(in) m(f); (Brit: for property) → Gerichtsvollzieher(in) m(f); (US: in court) → Gerichtsdiener(in) m(f)
(Brit: on estate) → (Guts)verwalter(in) m(f), → Landvogt(in) m(f) (obs)

bailiff

[ˈbeɪlɪf] n (Law) → ufficiale m giudiziario; (on estate) → amministratore m, fattore m
References in classic literature ?
We were dressed and barbered alike, and could pass for small farmers, or farm bailiffs, or shepherds, or carters; yes, or for village artisans, if we chose, our costume being in effect universal among the poor, because of its strength and cheapness.
The individual members of this class, however, are being constantly hurled down into the proletariat by the action of competition, and, as modern industry develops, they even see the moment approaching when they will completely disappear as an independent section of modern society, to be replaced, in manufactures, agriculture and commerce, by overlookers, bailiffs and shopmen.
Athos, then, went to pay a visit to one of his friends absent at the time," continued Treville, "to a young Bearnais, a cadet in his Majesty's Guards, the company of Monsieur Dessessart, but scarcely had he arrived at his friend's and taken up a book, while waiting his return, when a mixed crowd of bailiffs and soldiers came and laid siege to the house, broke open several doors--"
There, disguised under other names, and concealed under other costumes, are police agents, magistrates, attorneys-general, and bailiffs.
As the fop contrived to dress his bailiffs in his livery and make them wait on his guests at table, so the chagrins which the bad heart gives off as bubbles, at once take form as ladies and gentlemen in the street, shopmen or bar-keepers in hotels, and threaten or insult whatever is threatenable and insultable in us.
These were rural neighbors, cures and bailiffs of adjacent estates.
Often, from his high seat, he had listened indulgently to police court perjuries in cooked-up cases; but for the first time perjury was directed against him, and he no longer sat above the court, with the bailiffs, the Policemen's clubs, and the prison cells behind him.
We cannot send bailiffs to the Government to demand our dues for us; and as the wallet must be filled somehow," he said, striking his stomach, "we cannot afford to wait.
For her mother being dead, her father, finding himself not likely to recover, after his third attack of delirium tremens, wrote a manly and pathetic letter to Miss Pinkerton, recommending the orphan child to her protection, and so descended to the grave, after two bailiffs had quarrelled over his corpse.
He had stood in danger of arrest; of bailiffs, and a jail--a vulgar jail, to which the common people with small incomes went.
Casson himself, the personal witness to the stranger's visit, pronounced contemptuously to be nothing better than a bailiff, such as Satchell had been before him.
He had given instructions to his bailiff to send the postillion carriage on to Southampton, to be ready for their journey home, and to arrange for relays of his own horses to be sent on at once.