bails


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

bail 1

 (bāl)
n.
1. Security, usually a sum of money, exchanged for the release of an arrested person as a guarantee of that person's appearance for trial.
2. Release from imprisonment provided by the payment of such money.
3. A person who provides this security.
tr.v. bailed, bail·ing, bails
1. To secure the release of by providing security.
2. To release (a person) for whom security has been paid.
3. Informal To extricate from a difficult situation: always bailing you out of trouble.
Idioms:
jump/skip bail
To fail to appear in court and so forfeit one's bail.
make bail
To secure enough money or property to pay the amount of one's bail.

[Middle English, custody, from Old French, from baillier, to take charge of, from Latin bāiulāre, to carry a load, from bāiulus, carrier of a burden.]

bail′er n.

bail 2

 (bāl)
v. bailed, bail·ing, bails
v.tr.
1. To remove (water) from a boat by repeatedly filling a container and emptying it over the side.
2. To empty (a boat) of water by bailing.
v.intr.
1. To empty a boat of water by bailing.
2. To parachute from an aircraft; eject. Often used with out: bailed out of the damaged airplane at the last possible moment.
3. To abandon a project or enterprise. Often used with out: The investors bailed out when it looked as though the company was going to be unprofitable.
n.
A container used for emptying water from a boat.

[From Middle English baille, bucket, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *bāiula, water container, from Latin bāiulāre, to carry a load.]

bail′er n.

click for a larger image
bail3
covered wagon

bail 3

 (bāl)
n.
1. The arched hooplike handle of a container, such as a pail.
2. An arch or hoop, such as one of those used to support the top of a covered wagon.
3. A hinged bar on a typewriter that holds the paper against the platen.
4. The pivoting U-shaped part of a fishing reel that guides the line onto the spool during rewinding.
5. A small loop, usually of metal, attached to a pendant to enable it to be strung on a necklace or bracelet.

[Middle English beil, perhaps from Old English *bēgel or of Scandinavian origin; see bheug- in Indo-European roots.]

bail 4

 (bāl)
n.
1. Chiefly British A pole or bar used to confine or separate animals.
2. Sports One of the two crossbars that form the top of a wicket used in the game of cricket.

[Old French dialectal, probably from Latin baculum, stick; see bacillus.]

bails

Two small pieces of wood that rest horizontally in grooves on top of the stumps.
References in classic literature ?
Since leaving London, what with travelling expenses, bribes, the purchase of the elephant, bails, and fines, Mr.
Bime by, allee same dlown, velly quick, you no bail now.
In Russia we Orthodox folk DO go bail for one another, but in this case I thought it must have been done by some English stranger who was not conversant with the ways of the country.
Excessive bail shall not be required nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.
Harper did not appear, however, until after the prisoner, feeling very weak and ill, had been hailed into court and remanded at five hundred dollars' bail to await the result of his victim's injuries.
Therefore, I call upon you both--as I was about to say when I was interrupted by my clerk--to find bail.
He remanded me at once for the production of the witness, expressing, at the same time, his willingness to take bail for my reappearance if I could produce one responsible surety to offer it.
If you were not my own son I would dismiss you on the spot; it is a disgrace to have a horse brought to the shop in a condition like that; you are liable to be taken up by the police for such driving, and if you are you need not look to me for bail, for I have spoken to you till I'm tired; you must look out for yourself.