balance-of-payments problem


Also found in: Thesaurus.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.balance-of-payments problem - an economic problem caused by payments for imports being greater than receipts for exports
problem, job - a state of difficulty that needs to be resolved; "she and her husband are having problems"; "it is always a job to contact him"; "urban problems such as traffic congestion and smog"
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite the fact that the volume of exports to China is increasing, the fundamental nature of Latin American exports is undermining growth and creating an impending balance-of-payments problem.
The IMF authorities claim that policy changes designed are sufficient to overcome the balance-of-payments problem and fiscal imbalances, and that these do not cause unavoidable harm to the country.
Thus the second option, to attract direct foreign investment, does little to alleviate the balance-of-payments problem that is at the root of the current crisis.
So when the price of oil went up in 1973-74 and again in 1979-80, it caused a severe balance-of-payments problem.
This imbalance between the domestic and export-oriented sectors meant that growth, rather than solving the balance-of-payments problem, made it worse.
Liberalization of the capital market is likely to lead to a temporary capital inflow and a real currency appreciation, which depresses tradeable activities, followed by a capital outflow, which creates a balance-of-payments problem.
ii) The Balance-of-Payments Problem and Resource Allocation in Pakistan--A Linear Programming Approach by Syed Nawab Haider Naqvi (1963).
ii) The Balance-of-Payments Problem and Resource Allocation in Pakistan A Linear Programming Approach by Syed Nawab Haider Naqvi (1963).
ii) The Balance-of-Payments Problem and Resource Allocation in Pakistan - A Linear Programming Approach by Syed Nawab Haider Naqvi (1963).
They are available to EU neighbour countries experiencing severe balance-of-payments problems.
This was all the more inexcusable since balance-of-payments problems were supposed to be the IMF's main area of expertise and external economic surveillance was supposed to be its basic raison d'etre.
In a global financial upheaval like our most recent one, capital flows shift abruptly and dramatically, causing credit, financing, and balance-of-payments problems, as well as volatile exchange rates.