baldness


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bald

 (bôld)
adj. bald·er, bald·est
1. Lacking hair on the head.
2. Lacking a natural or usual covering: a bald spot on the lawn.
3. Lacking treads: a bald tire.
4. Zoology Having white feathers or markings on the head, as in some birds or mammals.
5. Lacking ornamentation; unadorned.
6. Undisguised; blunt: a bald statement of policy.

[Middle English balled, probably from bal, ball; see ball1. Sense 4, perhaps partly of Celtic origin; akin to Welsh bal, having a white streak on the forehead (of horses), Irish ball, spot, mark, and English blaze, white mark on the face of an animal; see blaze2.]

bald′ly adv.
bald′ness n.

Baldness

See also hair; head.

baldness. Also called alopecia, phalacrosis. — acomous, adj.
Medicine. medical specialist who treats baldness.
Medicine. congenital or acquired baldness. Also atrichosis.
baldness, especially at the top or back of the head. — calvous, adj.
a dread of baldness.
baldness.

Baldness

 

See Also:HAIR

  1. Bald as a ballpeen hammer —Thomas Lux
  2. Bald as a brass knob —Beverly Farmer
  3. Bald as a nun —Patrick White
  4. Bald and wrinkled as a lizard —Sarah Bird

    See Also:WRINKLES

  5. Bald as a balloon —Percival Wilde
  6. Bald as a barefaced lie —Anon
  7. Bald as a bearing —Loren D. Estleman
  8. Bald as a billiard ball —Anon

    Of the many objects comparatively linked with baldness, the billiard or cue ball probably ranks at the very top.

  9. Bald as a brick —Raymond Chandler
  10. Bald as an egg —Anon
  11. Bald as a football —William Boyd
  12. Bald as an orange —Thomas Bailey Aldrich
  13. Bald as a winter tree —William Morris
  14. Bald as convicts —George Garrett
  15. Bald as peeled onion —Margaret Laurence
  16. Bald as the beach —William Diehl
  17. Bald as the palm of your hand —Richard Harris Barham
  18. Bald as time —Richard Prome
  19. Bald head shining like a polished stone —George Garrett
  20. The gleaming skull [of bald-headed man] shone like a supernatural sun —Sholem Asch
  21. Had gone completely bald very young as though to get that over with as soon as possible —Helen Hudson
  22. Hair beginning to recede like the polar ice cap in warm weather —Jean Thompson
  23. Head as smooth as a knob —Russell Baker, New York Times, May 17, 1986
  24. He had a bald patch on the top of his head which made him look rather like a monk —Guy De Maupassant
  25. He was bald, his back hair was thick and projected like one of those large tree mushrooms that grow on the mossy side of a trunk —Saul Bellow
  26. His bald head coming to a point, like an egg —Richard Llwellyn
  27. His bald head shone … like an agitated moon —Erich Maria Remarque
  28. His head [bald, with ring of grey-brown hair] was like the brown edges of a leaf in fall, a sign that the tree, however tall and green from a distance, was being eaten away at the edges, dying from the outside in —Jay Parini
  29. His strong, bald head had a dull glow, like old ivory —Ivan Bunin
  30. No more hair than a stone —John MacDonald
  31. A semi-circular fringe of white hair surrounding his bald pate like a broken halo —Margaret Millar
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.baldness - the condition of having no hair on the top of the headbaldness - the condition of having no hair on the top of the head
depilation, hairlessness - the condition of being void of hair
alopecia - loss of hair (especially on the head) or loss of wool or feathers; in humans it can result from heredity or hormonal imbalance or certain diseases or drugs and treatments (chemotherapy for cancer)
male pattern baldness, male-patterned baldness - loss of hair on the crown of the head

baldness

noun hairlessness, alopecia (Pathology), baldheadedness, baldpatedness, glabrousness (Biology) He wears a cap to cover a spot of baldness.
Translations
صَلَع
plešatostsuchopárnost
skaldethed
kopaszság
skalli
plešivosť
dazlaklıkkellik

baldness

[ˈbɔːldnɪs] N
1. [of person] → calvicie f
2. [of tyre] → desgaste m
3. [of statement] → lo directo; [of style] → lo escueto

baldness

[ˈbɔːldnɪs] ncalvitie f

baldness

n
Kahlheit f
(of style, statement)Knappheit f

baldness

[ˈbɔːldnɪs] ncalvizie fsg

bald

(boːld) adjective
1. (of people) with little or no hair on the head. a bald head; He is going bald (= becoming bald).
2. (of birds, animals) without feathers, fur etc. a bald patch on the dog's back.
3. bare or plain. a bald statement of the facts.
ˈbaldness noun
ˈbalding adjective
becoming bald.
ˈbaldly adverb
in a plain or bare way. He answered her questions baldly.

bald·ness

n. calvicie.

baldness

n calvicie f; frontal — calvicie frontal; vertex — calvicie del vértice, calvicie de la parte superior de la cabeza
References in classic literature ?
If I am reserved to wear a wig, I am at least prepared, externally,' in allusion to his baldness, 'for that distinction.
This solemn deliberation he did not conceal; he rubbed his hands over his head, displacing the cap which covered its disastrous baldness.
If it were not for this baldness, and a kind of crapulous air I can't disguise from myself - if it weren't for this and that and t'other thing - I - I've forgot what I was saying.
This gentle expression was the more interesting because the schoolmaster's nose, an irregular aquiline twisted a little on one side, had rather a formidable character; and his brow, moreover, had that peculiar tension which always impresses one as a sign of a keen impatient temperament: the blue veins stood out like cords under the transparent yellow skin, and this intimidating brow was softened by no tendency to baldness, for the grey bristly hair, cut down to about an inch in length, stood round it in as close ranks as ever.
Three score years and ten, baldness, and spectacles, have their advantages after all
Nor is it difficult to perceive the tendency of this abandon-to elevate immeasurably all the energies of mind-but, again, so to mingle the greatest possible fire, force, delicacy, and all good things, with the lowest possible bathos, baldness, and imbecility, as to render it not a matter of doubt that the average results of mind in such a school will be found inferior to those results in one (ceteris paribus) more artificial.
Horne Fisher was fifteen years older; his thin hair had faded to frontal baldness, and his long, thin hands dropped less with affectation and more with fatigue.
He was a man of somewhat less than average height, inclined to corpulence, with his hair, worn long, arranged over the scalp so as to conceal his baldness.
His broad, grizzled head, with its shining patch of baldness, was in the immediate foreground of our vision.
Of course, as we have seen, he was quite a simple man; indeed be might have passed for a boy again if he had been able to take his baldness off; but he had also a noble sense of justice and a lion's courage to do what seemed right to him; and having thought the matter out with anxious care after the flight of the children, he went down on all fours and crawled into the kennel.
But the doctor was much the more respectable-looking man of the two; his baldness was more intellectual and benevolent; there was a delicacy and propriety in the pulpiness of his fat white chin, a bland bagginess in his unwhiskered cheeks, a reverent roughness about his eyebrows and a fullness in his lower eyelids, which raised him far higher, physiognomically speaking, in the social scale, than my old prison acquaintance.
In spite of his obtrusive baldness, he gave the impression of youth.