ballad


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bal·lad

 (băl′əd)
n.
1.
a. A narrative poem, often of folk origin and intended to be sung, consisting of simple stanzas and usually having a refrain.
b. The music for such a poem.
2. A popular song especially of a romantic or sentimental nature.

[Middle English balade, poem or song in stanza form, from Old French ballade, from Old Provençal balada, song sung while dancing, from balar, to dance, from Late Latin ballāre, to dance; see ball2.]

bal·lad′ic (bə-lăd′ĭk, bă-) adj.

ballad

(ˈbæləd)
n
1. (Music, other) a narrative song with a recurrent refrain
2. (Poetry) a narrative poem in short stanzas of popular origin, originally sung to a repeated tune
3. (Pop Music) a slow sentimental song, esp a pop song
[C15: from Old French balade, from Old Provençal balada song accompanying a dance, from balar to dance, from Late Latin ballāre; see ball2]

bal•lad

(ˈbæl əd)

n.
1. a simple song; air.
2. a simple narrative poem, esp. of folk origin, composed in short stanzas and adapted for singing.
3. a slow romantic or sentimental popular song.
[1350–1400; Middle English balade < Middle French < Old Provençal balada dance, dancing-song =bal(ar) to dance (< Late Latin ballāre; see ball2) + -ada -ade1]
bal•lad•ic (bəˈlæd ɪk) adj.

ballad

1. A narrative poem in short stanzas, often of folk origin and intended to be sung.
2. A narrative song, or piece in similar style.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ballad - a narrative song with a recurrent refrainballad - a narrative song with a recurrent refrain
song, vocal - a short musical composition with words; "a successful musical must have at least three good songs"
minstrelsy - ballads sung by minstrels
2.ballad - a narrative poem of popular originballad - a narrative poem of popular origin  
poem, verse form - a composition written in metrical feet forming rhythmical lines
Edda - either of two distinct works in Old Icelandic dating from the late 13th century and consisting of 34 mythological and heroic ballads composed between 800 and 1200; the primary source for Scandinavian mythology

ballad

noun song, saga, ditty, folk song, canzone one of the most beautiful ballads he ever wrote
Translations
قَصيدَةٌ قَصَصِيَّةٌ شعبيّة غِنائِيّه
baladapísnička
balladefolkevise
balladi
ballada
ballaîa
baladėsentimentali daina
balāde
populárna sentimentálna pieseň

ballad

[ˈbæləd] Nbalada f; (Spanish) → romance m, corrido m (Mex)

ballad

[ˈbæləd] n (= song) → ballade f

ballad

n (Mus, Liter) → Ballade f

ballad

[ˈbæləd] nballata

ballad

(ˈbӕləd) noun
a simple, often sentimental, song. Older people prefer ballads to pop music.
References in classic literature ?
Here, it is true, were none of the appliances which popular merriment would so readily have found in the England of Elizabeth's time, or that of James -- no rude shows of a theatrical kind; no minstrel, with his harp and legendary ballad, nor gleeman with an ape dancing to his music; no juggler, with his tricks of mimic witchcraft; no Merry Andrew, to stir up the multitude with jests, perhaps a hundred years old, but still effective, by their appeals to the very broadest sources of mirthful sympathy.
The common folk held him dear, and his memory is still green in ballad and tradition.
She passed into another ballad, this time a really doleful one.
Sit quite still and don't talk: but you may sing a song, if you can sing; or you may say a nice long interesting ballad - one of those you promised to teach me; or a story.
What did all this portend, and what portended the swift hoisting-up of Monsieur Gabelle behind a servant on horseback, and the conveying away of the said Gabelle (double-laden though the horse was), at a gallop, like a new version of the German ballad of Leonora?
Once she asked for a particular ballad, which she said her Ury (who was yawning in a great chair) doted on; and at intervals she looked round at him, and reported to Agnes that he was in raptures with the music.
The knight in the meantime, had brought the strings into some order, and after a short prelude, asked his host whether he would choose a sirvente in the language of oc, or a lai in the language of oui, or a virelai, or a ballad in the vulgar English.
The endless ballad had come to an end at last, and the whole diminished company about the camp-fire had broken into the chorus I had heard so often:
Some, who seemed to be better informed than the rest, declared that the "row" would begin with the ballad of the KING OF THULE and rushed to the subscribers' entrance to warn Carlotta.
or Rocinante, for that, ladies mine, is my horse's name, and Don Quixote of La Mancha is my own; for though I had no intention of declaring myself until my achievements in your service and honour had made me known, the necessity of adapting that old ballad of Lancelot to the present occasion has given you the knowledge of my name altogether prematurely.
The old ballad which tells of their fight says that they thought nothing for to flee, but stiffly for to stand.
I well remember that suggestions arising from this ballad, led us into a train of thought wherein there became manifest an opinion of Usher's which I mention not so much on account of its novelty (for other men* have thought thus,) as on account of the pertinacity with which he maintained it.