ballad stanza


Also found in: Wikipedia.

ballad stanza

n.
A four-line stanza often used in ballads, rhyming in the second and fourth lines and having four metrical feet in the first and third lines and three in the second and fourth.

ballad stanza

n
(Poetry) a four-line stanza, often used in ballads, in which the second and fourth lines rhyme and have three stresses each and the first and third lines are unrhymed and have four stresses each

bal′lad stan`za


n.
a four-line stanza, popular in ballads, with the first and third lines in iambic tetrameter and the second and fourth in iambic trimeter, rhyming abcb.
[1930–35]
References in periodicals archive ?
5) Martin shows that what we now call "the" ballad stanza was only one of a range of ballad stanzas recognized by mid-Victorian poets, prosodists, and readers; to supplement Martin's reading with an additional example, witness the opening lines of Newman's ballad translation of Book I of the Iliad:
More significantly McKay's conjunction of dialect and traditional prosody both denaturalizes dialect, rendering it a linguistic mode no less artificial, no more authentic, than standard English or the ballad stanza, and defamiliarizes and re-forms "English" poetry and poetic language.
This observation can be extended from rhymes to line length as well which, in turn, may throw the so-called ballad stanza, for instance (where a longer line alternates with a shorter one), into a new perspective.
Not one to kowtow to authority, Trower wields the ballad stanza like a fine old rust-flecked sword.
Add to this the historical resonance of a poem's genre--the sonnet, the ballad stanza, blank verse, among many others--and the levels of meaning multiply.
1), but unlike the Scottish bard, Dunbar rarely uses the standard ballad stanza.
Where Southey occasionally alters the traditional four-line stanza by adding an extra line or two, Zukovskij never varies from the traditional four-line ballad stanza.
The hymns Dickinson grew up hearing often borrow the skeleton of ballad narrative along with the ballad stanza.
I begin with a ballad stanza spoken by Ophelia, which Percy incorporated virtually unchanged into "The Friar of Orders Gray," a poem mostly his own, which he included in the section of his Reliques, "Ballads that Illustrate Shakespeare":
As Darlene Harbour Unrue points out in this welcome, albeit frustrating, study and collection of Porter's poetry, "Night-Blooming Cereus" is "insufficiently thought through," as if the writer's imagination and sense of music were stymied by what Unrue calls "Porter's comfortable four-line ballad stanza.
This discord in the ballad stanza signals the onset of violence.
This is the point of the traditional ballad stanza.