balladeer

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bal·lad·eer

 (băl′ə-dîr′)
n.
A singer of ballads.

balladeer

(ˌbæləˈdɪə)
n
a singer of ballads

bal•lad•eer

(ˌbæl əˈdɪər)

n.
a person who sings ballads.
[1630–40]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.balladeer - a singer of popular balladsballadeer - a singer of popular ballads    
singer, vocalist, vocalizer, vocaliser - a person who sings
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike most Victorian domestic balladeers Wallace wasn't always maudlin.
Penny Dreadfuls, The Ourz, Radioactive Grandma, Our Krypton Son and Murder Balladeers are among the quality array of support acts lined up for this miniature tour.
Having studied these verses at some length, I have come to the conclusion that the cause has been the difficulty facing balladeers in finding sufficient words to rhyme with ruck.
One minute hard rock, the next big melodic soaraway moments and then they finally show they're natural balladeers.
This year's two-day bill offered an eclectic mix of styles, from the hardcore rap of Eminem to poptastic balladeers The Script and from red hot one-man hit factory Bruno Mars to grizzled eighties legends Big Country - there was something for everyone.
At Pilu Pura, the present- day balladeers are a big hit as they belt out the golden oldies with a contemporary twist.
He might be 57 now but he is still one of the best balladeers around who is just as happy in rock and soul and even throws in a touch of opera.
Although often unfairly written off as a cheesy bunch of balladeers, Crowded House at their best are versatile and affecting and Neil Finn had plenty of good banter.
Norwegian acoustic balladeers make songs that are picked up and ruined by mobile phone companies' cinema adverts.
GRAMMY winner Michael Bolton is one of America's most successful ever balladeers, with more than 50 million albums sold worldwide.
Mayo's famous balladeers held a hometown celebration in Mulranny to celebrate 40 years in showbusiness.
His narrative, which frequently references the music of Asbury Park's native son, Bruce Springsteen, and other balladeers of Americana, echoes the words of another of the city's native sons, writer Stephen Crane, who said: "From the very beginning, Asbury Park was a symbol of the nation's hopes and hypocrisy.