balls


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ball 1

 (bôl)
n.
1.
a. A spherical object or entity: a steel ball.
b. A spherical or almost spherical body: a ball of flame.
2. Sports
a. Any of various movable and round or oblong objects used in various athletic activities and games.
b. Such an object moving, thrown, hit, or kicked in a particular manner: a low ball; a fair ball.
c. A game, especially baseball or basketball, played with such an object.
d. A pitched baseball that does not pass through the strike zone and is not swung at by the batter.
3.
a. A solid spherical or pointed projectile, such as one shot from a cannon.
b. Projectiles of this kind considered as a group.
4. A rounded part or protuberance, especially of the body: the ball of the foot.
5. Vulgar Slang
a. A testicle.
b. balls Courage, especially when reckless.
c. balls Great presumptuousness.
v. balled, ball·ing, balls
v.tr.
1. To form into a ball.
2. Vulgar Slang To have sexual intercourse with.
v.intr.
1. To become formed into a ball.
2. Vulgar Slang To have sexual intercourse.
Phrasal Verb:
ball up
To confuse; bungle.
Idioms:
have(someone) by the balls Vulgar Slang
To have control over someone; have someone at one's mercy.
on the ball Informal
1. Alert, competent, or efficient: a teacher who is really on the ball.
2. Relating to qualities, such as competence, skill, or knowledge, that are necessary for success: a manager who has a lot on the ball; a student who has nothing on the ball.

[Middle English bal, probably from Old English *beall; see bhel- in Indo-European roots.]

ball 2

 (bôl)
n.
1. A formal gathering for social dancing.
2. Informal An extremely enjoyable time or experience: We had a ball during our vacation.

[French bal, from Old French, from baller, to dance, from Late Latin ballāre, from Greek ballizein; see gwelə- in Indo-European roots.]

balls

(bɔːlz)
pl n
1. (Anatomy) the testicles
2. by the balls so as to be rendered powerless
3. nonsense; rubbish
4. courage; forcefulness
interj
an exclamation of strong disagreement, contempt, annoyance, etc
Usage: Both its anatomical senses and its various extended senses nowadays have far less impact than they used to, and seem unlikely to cause offence, though some older or more conservative people may object. Interestingly, its use in the sense of courage is exactly paralleled in the Spanish term 'cojones'
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

balls

(Taboo slang)
plural noun
1. bravery, face (informal), spirit, bottle (slang), resolution, nerve, daring, courage, guts (informal), pluck, grit, backbone, fortitude, toughness, mettle, boldness, firmness, valour, spunk (informal), fearlessness, intrepidity, cojones (Spanish), hardihood, ballsiness (taboo slang), dauntlessness, lion-heartedness I never had the balls to do anything like this.
2. nonsense, stuff, bull, rubbish, shit (taboo slang), pants (slang), rot, crap (slang), garbage (informal), folly, trash, bunk (informal), bullshit (taboo slang), hot air (informal), tosh (slang, chiefly Brit.), absurdity, waffle (informal, chiefly Brit.), bollocks (Brit. taboo slang), pap, cobblers (Brit. taboo slang), bilge (informal), drivel, twaddle, tripe (informal), gibberish, guff (slang), bombast, moonshine, claptrap (informal), hogwash, hokum (slang, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), codswallop (Brit. slang), piffle (informal), poppycock (informal), balderdash (slang), bosh (informal), senselessness, eyewash (informal), kak (S. African taboo slang), ludicrousness, fatuity, tommyrot, horsefeathers (U.S. slang), bunkum or buncombe (chiefly U.S.) What complete and utter balls!
3. (Taboo slang) testicles, bollocks or ballocks (taboo slang), testes, rocks (U.S. taboo slang), nuts (taboo slang), cobblers (Brit. taboo slang), gonads, goolies (taboo slang), family jewels (slang), cojones (Spanish), nads (U.S. taboo slang) I kneed him in the balls.
balls something up (Brit. informal) mess up, bungle, botch, cock up (Brit. slang), fuck up (offensive taboo slang), make a hash of (informal), muck up (Brit. slang), make a pig's ear of (informal) I have no intention of letting you balls it up.
Translations
топки
munaapallit
golyókherék
kiaušai
boaşecoaieouă
gule

balls

[ˈbɔːlz] npl
(= testicles) → couilles fpl
(= courage, guts) to have balls → avoir des couilles
(= rubbish) → conneries fpl balls-up [ˈbɔːlzʌp] (British) n (= cock-up)
It was a complete balls-up → Ça a complètement merdé. , Ça a complètement foiré.
to make a balls-up of sth → merder avec qch

balls

[bɔːlz] (fam!) nplcoglioni mpl (fam!) (fig) (bullshit) → cazzate fpl (fam!)
References in classic literature ?
Presently more boys and bigger came out, and boys from other houses on their way to calling-over, and more balls were sent for.
One of those balls where one always enjoys oneself.
At two o'clock the tennis balls began, according to Grimaud's directions, to take the direction of the moat, much to the joy of La Ramee, who marked fifteen whenever the duke sent a ball into the moat; and very soon balls were wanting, so many had gone over.
When the hands were closed they looked like clusters of unpainted wooden balls as large as walnuts fastened together by steel rods.
This was a little joke of John's; he used to say that a regular course of "the Birtwick horseballs" would cure almost any vicious horse; these balls, he said, were made up of patience and gentleness, firmness and petting, one pound of each to be mixed up with half a pint of common sense, and given to the horse every day.
In their childlike glee, aroused by the fire and their luck in successfully cannonading the French, our artillerymen only noticed this battery when two balls, and then four more, fell among our guns, one knocking over two horses and another tearing off a munition-wagon driver's leg.
Lady Janet has issued invitations for one of her grand balls at Mablethorpe House; and sh e has caused the report to be circulated everywhere that the object of the festival is 'to celebrate the marriage of Mr.
The meat is made into balls about the size of billiard balls, and being well seasoned and spiced might be taken for turtle-balls or veal balls.
I should like to see you very much; but I shall have many opportunities of seeing you equally charming, on the occasion of some of the numberless balls and parties that are to be, and I cannot disappoint my friends by postponing my return so long.
Now she had a golden ball in her hand, which was her favourite plaything; and she was always tossing it up into the air, and catching it again as it fell.
Julius Beaufort, on the night of her annual ball, never failed to appear at the Opera; indeed, she always gave her ball on an Opera night in order to emphasise her complete superiority to household cares, and her possession of a staff of servants competent to organise every detail of the entertainment in her absence.
He has not a good length, but he varies his action bewilderingly, and has one especially teasing ball which falls from the branches just as you have stepped out of your ground to look for it.