balm


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Related to balm: balm of Gilead, lemon balm

balm

 (bäm)
n.
1.
a. A chiefly Mediterranean perennial herb (Melissa officinalis) in the mint family, grown for its lemon-scented foliage, which is used as a seasoning or for tea. Also called lemon balm.
b. Any of several related plants in the mint family, such as the bee balm and the horse balm.
2. Any of various aromatic resins exuded from several trees and shrubs, especially the balm of Gilead (Commiphora) and related plants in the family Burseraceae.
3. An aromatic salve or oil.
4. A pleasing aromatic fragrance.
5. A soothing, healing, or comforting agent or quality.

[Middle English baume, balsam, from Old French basme, from Latin balsamum; see balsam.]

balm

(bɑːm)
n
1. (Plants) any of various oily aromatic resinous substances obtained from certain tropical trees and used for healing and soothing. See also balsam1
2. (Plants) any plant yielding such a substance, esp the balm of Gilead
3. something comforting or soothing: soft music is a balm.
4. (Complementary Medicine) any aromatic or oily substance used for healing or soothing
5. (Plants) Also called: lemon balm an aromatic Eurasian herbaceous plant, Melissa officinalis, having clusters of small fragrant white two-lipped flowers: family Lamiaceae (labiates)
6. a pleasant odour
[C13: from Old French basme, from Latin balsamum balsam]
ˈbalmˌlike adj

balm

(bɑm)

n.
1. any of various fragrant gum resins used in perfumery or medicine, esp. from tropical trees of the genus Commiphora, of the bursera family.
2. a plant or tree yielding such a substance.
3. any aromatic or fragrant ointment used for healing, soothing, or mitigating pain.
4. aromatic fragrance.
5. any of various aromatic plants of the mint family, esp. those of the genus Melissa, having ovate, scented leaves.
6. anything that heals, soothes, or mitigates pain: the balm of friendship.
[1175–1225; Middle English basme < Anglo-French, Old French < Latin balsamum balsam]

balm

, balsam - Greek balsamon is the source of both balm and balsam; it was an oily resin of various trees and shrubs.
See also related terms for shrubs.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.balm - any of various aromatic resinous substances used for healing and soothingbalm - any of various aromatic resinous substances used for healing and soothing
balsam - any of various fragrant oleoresins used in medicines and perfumes
balm of Gilead - a fragrant oleoresin
2.balm - semisolid preparation (usually containing a medicine) applied externally as a remedy or for soothing an irritationbalm - semisolid preparation (usually containing a medicine) applied externally as a remedy or for soothing an irritation
arnica - an ointment used in treating bruises
baby oil - an ointment for babies
balsam - an ointment containing a fragrant resin
carron oil - an ointment formerly used to treat burns
cerate - a hard medicated paste made of lard or oil mixed with wax or resin
chrism, chrisom, holy oil, sacramental oil - a consecrated ointment consisting of a mixture of oil and balsam
lip balm - a balm applied to the lips
mentholated salve - a salve containing menthol
mercurial ointment - an ointment containing mercury
curative, cure, therapeutic, remedy - a medicine or therapy that cures disease or relieve pain
zinc ointment - an ointment containing zinc that is used to treat certain skin diseases
medical specialty, medicine - the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques
lanolin, wool fat, wool grease - a yellow viscous animal oil extracted from wool; a mixture of fatty acids and esters; used in some ointments and cosmetics

balm

noun
1. ointment, cream, lotion, salve, emollient, balsam, liniment, embrocation, unguent, cerate The balm is very soothing.
2. comfort, support, relief, cheer, consolation, solace, palliative, anodyne, succour, restorative, curative This place is a balm to the soul.

balm

verb
To make or become calm:
Translations
بَلْسَم،
balzám
balsam
gyógyír
harmabót, allt sem mÿkir og græîir
balzamasraminantisšvelnumasšvelnus
mierinājumsremdinājums
derde devateselli

balm

[bɑːm] N (also fig) → bálsamo m

balm

[ˈbɑːm] n
(lit)baume m lip balm, aftershave balm
(fig)baume m

balm

n
(lit, fig)Balsam m
(Bot) → Melisse f

balm

[bɑːm] n (also) (fig) → balsamo

balm

(baːm) noun
something that soothes. The music was balm to my ears.
ˈbalmy adjective
ˈbalminess noun

balm

n. bálsamo, ungüento calmante, sedante de uso externo.

balm

n bálsamo; lip — bálsamo or protector m labial
References in classic literature ?
If he be compassionate towards the afflictions of others, it shows that his heart is like the noble tree, that is wounded itself, when it gives the balm.
Whether Tempter sent, or whether tempest tossed thee here ashore, Desolate yet all undaunted, on this desert land enchanted -- On this home by Horror haunted -- tell me truly, I implore -- Is there -- is there balm in Gilead?
Whether Tempter sent, or whether tempest tossed thee here ashore, Desolate, yet all undaunted, on this desert land enchanted-- On this home by Horror haunted--tell me truly, I implore-- Is there--is there balm in Gilead?
Friendship is certainly the finest balm for the pangs of disappointed love.
While my seared soul was steeped in the healing balm of those gracious sounds, it seemed to me that I could almost resuffer the torments which had gone before, in order to be so healed again.
But she never suspected that she was not an angel of healing and the balm of Gilead in disguise, to the suffering neighbors.
With his air of looking down on the highest, and confidentially inviting you to be of his company in the seat of the scorner he is irresistible; his very confession that he is a snob, too, is balm and solace to the reader who secretly admires the splendors he affects to despise.
Meg bathed the insulted hand with glycerine and tears, Beth felt that even her beloved kittens would fail as a balm for griefs like this, Jo wrathfully proposed that Mr.
Poor, dear woman," said Debray, "she is no doubt occupied in distilling balm for the hospitals, or in making cosmetics for herself or friends.
The night fever over, I looked about for balm to that wound also, and found some nearer home than at Gilead.
We shall plant the other to-morrow, my dear Mynheer Cornelius," said Rosa, in a low voice, who understood the intense grief of the unfortunate tulip-fancier, and who, with the pure sacred love of her innocent heart, poured these kind words, like a drop of balm, on the bleeding wounds of Cornelius.
Then she lost herself in drowsy contemplation of the soothing balm of his strength: Life poured from the ends of his fingers, driving the pain before it, or so it seemed to her, until with the easement of pain, she fell asleep and he stole away.