balsam


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Related to balsam: balsam pear

bal·sam

(bôl′səm)
n.
1.
a. Any of several aromatic resins, such as balsam of Peru and balsam of Tolu, that contain considerable amounts of benzoic acid, cinnamic acid, or both, or their esters.
b. Any of several other fragrant plant resins, such as Canada balsam.
c. A similar substance, especially a fragrant ointment used as medication; a balm.
2. Any of various trees, especially the balsam fir, yielding an aromatic resinous substance.
3. See impatiens.

[Latin balsamum, balm of Gilead, from Greek balsamon, of Semitic origin; see bśm in the Appendix of Semitic roots.]

balsam

(ˈbɔːlsəm)
n
1. (Plants) any of various fragrant oleoresins, such as balm or tolu, obtained from any of several trees and shrubs and used as a base for medicines and perfumes
2. (Plants) any of various similar substances used as medicinal or ceremonial ointments
3. (Plants) any of certain aromatic resinous turpentines. See also Canada balsam
4. (Plants) any plant yielding balsam
5. (Plants) Also called: busy Lizzie any of several balsaminaceous plants of the genus Impatiens, esp I. balsamina, cultivated for its brightly coloured flowers
6. anything healing or soothing
[C15: from Latin balsamum, from Greek balsamon, from Hebrew bāśām spice]
balsamic adj
ˈbalsamy adj

bal•sam

(ˈbɔl səm)

n.
1. any of various fragrant resins exuded from certain trees, esp. trees of the genus Commiphora, as balm-of-Gilead. Compare balm (def. 1).
3. any of various trees yielding a balsam, esp. the balsam fir.
4. any of several plants belonging to the genus Impatiens, as I. balsamina, a common garden annual.
5. any aromatic ointment for ceremonial or medicinal use.
[before 1000; Middle English balsamum, Old English balzaman < Latin balsamum < Greek bálsamon < Semitic (compare Hebrew bāshām)]
bal•sam•ic (bɔlˈsæm ɪk) adj.

balsam

- First referred to an aromatic resinous substance with healing or soothing properties.
See also related terms for healing.

balm, balsam - Greek balsamon is the source of both balm and balsam; it was an oily resin of various trees and shrubs.
See also related terms for shrubs.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.balsam - any seed plant yielding balsambalsam - any seed plant yielding balsam  
phanerogam, seed plant, spermatophyte - plant that reproduces by means of seeds not spores
balsam - any of various fragrant oleoresins used in medicines and perfumes
2.balsam - any of various fragrant oleoresins used in medicines and perfumes
balsam - any seed plant yielding balsam
balsam of tolu, tolu, tolu balsam - aromatic yellowish brown balsam from the tolu balsam tree used especially in cough syrups
oleoresin - a naturally occurring mixture of a resin and an essential oil; obtained from certain plants
balm - any of various aromatic resinous substances used for healing and soothing
3.balsam - an ointment containing a fragrant resinbalsam - an ointment containing a fragrant resin
ointment, salve, unguent, balm, unction - semisolid preparation (usually containing a medicine) applied externally as a remedy or for soothing an irritation
Translations
بَلْسَم، دَواء، مُرَطِّب
balzám
balsambalsamin
BalsamSpringkraut
צרי
ilmkvoîa
ホウセンカ鳳仙花
balzams
niecierpek
balsam

balsam

[ˈbɔːlsəm] Nbálsamo m

balsam

[ˈbɔːlsəm] n
(= oil) → baume m
(= tree, shrub) → balsamier m

balsam

n
Balsam m
(Bot) → Springkraut nt

balsam

[ˈbɔːlsəm] nbalsamo

balsam

(ˈboːlsəm) noun
a pleasant-smelling substance obtained from certain trees. He inhaled balsam when he had a bad cold.
References in classic literature ?
Rebecca examined the wound, and having applied to it such vulnerary remedies as her art prescribed, informed her father that if fever could be averted, of which the great bleeding rendered her little apprehensive, and if the healing balsam of Miriam retained its virtue, there was nothing to fear for his guest's life, and that he might with safety travel to York with them on the ensuing day.
As he spoke he drew a small case of medicines from his pocket and rubbed the neck of the hunchback with some ointment made of balsam.
All that might be well dispensed with," said Don Quixote, "if I had remembered to make a vial of the balsam of Fierabras, for time and medicine are saved by one single drop.
Your mother will add to them a recipe for a certain balsam, which she had from a Bohemian and which has the miraculous virtue of curing all wounds that do not reach the heart.
A little sprig of balsam would not have mattered so much-- but geraniums
The men immediately hastened to collect a quantity of it, to use as an ointment for the galled backs of their horses, and as a balsam for their own pains and aches.
So I came quickly, and led by the white-haired Arthurs in a jacket and petticoat, entered a double-bedded room reeking with steam and Friar's Balsam.
Snagsby, touched by the spectacle before him, immediately lays upon the table half a crown, that magic balsam of his for all kinds of wounds.
The fresh chill air was faintly charged with the aroma of pine balsam, and the sky above was crystal clear and blue -- a great inverted cup of blessing.
The Doctor still read from cover to cover his Lancet and his Medical Journal, attended all professional gatherings, worked himself into an alternate state of exaltation and depression over the results of the election of officers, and reserved for himself a den of his own, in which before rows of little round bottles full of glycerine, Canadian balsam, and staining agents, he still cut sections with a microtome, and peeped through his long, brass, old-fashioned microscope at the arcana of nature.
She talked it all over with Diana Tuesday night in the twilight, as they sat on the big red stones by the Dryad's Bubble and made rainbows in the water with little twigs dipped in fir balsam.
Out of thy poisons brewedst thou balsam for thyself; thy cow, affliction, milkedst thou--now drinketh thou the sweet milk of her udder.