bandit


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ban·dit

 (băn′dĭt)
n.
1. A robber, especially one who robs at gunpoint.
2. An outlaw; a gangster.
3. One who cheats or exploits others.
4. Slang A hostile aircraft, especially a fighter aircraft.
Idiom:
make out like a bandit Slang
To be highly successful in a given enterprise.

[Italian bandito, from past participle of bandire, to proclaim, proscribe, banish, probably of Germanic origin; see bhā-2 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

ban′dit·ry n.

bandit

(ˈbændɪt)
n, pl -dits or -ditti (-ˈdɪtɪ)
a robber, esp a member of an armed gang; brigand
[C16: from Italian bandito, literally: banished man, from bandire to proscribe, from bando edict, ban1]
ˈbanditry n

ban•dit

(ˈbæn dɪt)

n., pl. ban•dits (Rare) ban•dit•ti (bænˈdɪt i)
1. a robber, esp. a member of a gang or marauding band.
2. an outlaw.
3. Informal. a person who takes unfair advantage of others.
[1585–95; < Italian banditi outlaws, pl. of bandito, past participle of bandire to banish, announce publicly < Gothic bandwjan to make a sign, indicate (see band1)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bandit - an armed thief who is (usually) a member of a bandbandit - an armed thief who is (usually) a member of a band
stealer, thief - a criminal who takes property belonging to someone else with the intention of keeping it or selling it

bandit

noun robber, gunman, crook, outlaw, pirate, raider, gangster, plunderer, mugger (informal), hijacker, looter, highwayman, racketeer, desperado, marauder, brigand, freebooter, footpad Reports say he was killed in an attack by armed bandits.

bandit

noun
Translations
قاطِع طَريق، لِص
bandita
banditrøver
bandita
ræningi
banditas
bandīts
razbojnikropar
eşkiyahaydut

bandit

[ˈbændɪt] Nbandido m
see also one-armed

bandit

[ˈbændɪt] n (= outlaw) → bandit m

bandit

nBandit(in) m(f), → Räuber(in) m(f)

bandit

[ˈbændɪt] nbandito, brigante m

bandit

(ˈbӕndit) noun
an outlaw or robber, especially as a member of a gang. They were attacked by bandits in the mountains.
References in classic literature ?
It is my opinion the fiddler David must have been an insipid sort of fellow; I like black Bothwell better: to my mind a man is nothing without a spice of the devil in him; and history may say what it will of James Hepburn, but I have a notion, he was just the sort of wild, fierce, bandit hero whom I could have consented to gift with my hand.
Jekyll (who was composite) now with the most sensitive apprehensions, now with a greedy gusto, projected and shared in the pleasures and adventures of Hyde; but Hyde was indifferent to Jekyll, or but remembered him as the mountain bandit remembers the cavern in which he conceals himself from pursuit.
He aimed a terrible blow at D'Artagnan, who avoided it by springing to one side; but by this movement he left a passage free to the bandit, who darted off toward the bastion.
Yes, yes; this is an adventure worthy a place in the varied career of that royal bandit.
As an officer of Don Carlos, I have no more standing than a bandit.
Squire Hawker played both the bigamist and the bandit.
All my riddles, however, revolve round our bandit chief," resumed the priest reflectively.
I've been looking for a good able-bodied bandit like you for years.
He was forced to perceive that he was not walking in the Styx, but in mud, that he was elbowed not by demons, but by thieves; that it was not his soul which was in question, but his life (since he lacked that precious conciliator, which places itself so effectually between the bandit and the honest man--a purse).
haunted by the visible spirit of a noted bandit named Vasquez, who had
Thus, a wounded prince or bandit chief, who is bleeding to death and too faint to move, except to the softest music
It vexes me that a man like that should take a wrong turn and gradually go to the bad, become a bandit, and die on the gallows.