bandwagon

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band·wag·on

 (bănd′wăg′ən)
n.
1. An elaborately decorated wagon used to transport musicians in a parade.
2. Informal A cause or party that attracts increasing numbers of adherents: young voters climbing aboard the party's bandwagon.
3. Informal A current trend: "Even brand-name [drug] companies ... have jumped on the generics bandwagon" (Beth Howard).

band′wag′on·ing n.

bandwagon

(ˈbændˌwæɡən)
n
1. US a wagon, usually high and brightly coloured, for carrying the band in a parade
2. jump on the bandwagon climb on the bandwagon get on the bandwagon to join or give support to a party or movement that seems to be assured of success

band•wag•on

(ˈbændˌwæg ən)

n.
a large ornate wagon for carrying band musicians, as in a circus.
Idioms:
climb or jump on the bandwagon, to join a party, cause, movement, etc., that appears to be gaining popular support.
[1850–55, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bandwagon - a popular trend that attracts growing support; "when they saw how things were going everybody jumped on the bandwagon"
vogue, style, trend - the popular taste at a given time; "leather is the latest vogue"; "he followed current trends"; "the 1920s had a style of their own"
2.bandwagon - a large ornate wagon for carrying a musical bandbandwagon - a large ornate wagon for carrying a musical band; "the gaudy bandwagon led the circus parade"
waggon, wagon - any of various kinds of wheeled vehicles drawn by an animal or a tractor
Translations

bandwagon

[ˈbændˌwægən] N to jump or climb on the bandwagonsubirse al carro or al tren

bandwagon

[ˈbændwægən] n
to jump on the bandwagon → prendre le train en marche

bandwagon

[ˈbændˌwægən] n to jump on the bandwagon (fig) → seguire la corrente
References in periodicals archive ?
In the study, he emphasizes that the case-specific discussion of Russia's choices of bandwagoning and balancing demonstrates the need for the field of international relations to take the costs of bandwagoning into account when considering the balance/bandwagon dichotomy and to recognize that those costs include such non-material or positional goods as prestige, status, and influence.
Vasquez acknowledges that I define bandwagoning as "any attempt to side with the stronger" but then claims that this is somehow different or inconsistent with "siding with the actor that .
In order to retain the balancing/bandwagoning dichotomy and to make it fit his balance-of-threat framework, Walt (1987, 17) redefined bandwagoning as "alignment with the source of danger.