banjo

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ban·jo

 (băn′jō)
n. pl. ban·jos or ban·joes
A usually fretted stringed instrument having a narrow neck and a hollow circular body with a covering of plastic or stretched skin on which the bridge rests. The modern American banjo typically has four strings and often a short fifth string plucked with the thumb.

[Earlier banshaw, banjore, banjo, probably of African origin and akin to Kimbundu and Tshiluba mbanza, a plucked stringed instrument (probably also influenced by bandore).]

ban′jo·ist n.

banjo

(ˈbændʒəʊ)
n, pl -jos or -joes
1. (Instruments) a stringed musical instrument with a long neck (usually fretted) and a circular drumlike body overlaid with parchment, plucked with the fingers or a plectrum
2. slang any banjo-shaped object, esp a frying pan
3. (Tools) slang Austral and NZ a long-handled shovel with a wide blade
4. (modifier) banjo-shaped: a banjo clock.
[C18: variant (US Southern pronunciation) of bandore]
ˈbanjoist n

ban•jo

(ˈbæn dʒoʊ)

n., pl. -jos, -joes.
a musical instrument of the guitar family, having a circular body covered in front with tightly stretched parchment and played with the fingers.
[1730–40]
ban′jo•ist, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.banjo - a stringed instrument of the guitar family that has long neck and circular bodybanjo - a stringed instrument of the guitar family that has long neck and circular body
fingerboard - a narrow strip of wood on the neck of some stringed instruments (violin or cello or guitar etc) where the strings are held against the wood with the fingers
stringed instrument - a musical instrument in which taut strings provide the source of sound
Translations
bendžo
banjo
banjo
bendžo
bendzsó
banjó
バンジョー
밴조
bandža
bandžo
bandżobanjo
bendžo
banjo
แบนโจ เครื่องดนตรี
bancobançobanjo
đàn banjô

banjo

[ˈbændʒəʊ] N (banjoes (banjos (pl))) → banjo m

banjo

[ˈbændʒəʊ] [banjoes or banjos] (pl) n (= musical instrument) → banjo m
to play the banjo → jouer du banjo

banjo

n pl <-es or (US) -s> → Banjo nt

banjo

[ˈbændʒəʊ] nbanjo m inv

banjo

(ˈbӕndʒou) plural ˈbanjo(e)s noun
a stringed musical instrument similar to the guitar. He plays the banjo; Play me a tune on the banjo.

banjo

آلة البانْـجو الـموسِيقِيَّة bendžo banjo Banjo μπάντζο banjo banjo banjo bendžo banjo バンジョー 밴조 banjo banjo bandżo banjo банджо banjo แบนโจ เครื่องดนตรี banço đàn banjô 班卓琴
References in classic literature ?
You could tell it was classical, because the banjo players were leaning back and chewing gum; and in New York restaurants only death or a classical speciality can stop banjoists.
Hailed as a "dynamic, original harmony vocal trio," their original, whimsical folk songs feature master banjoist and composer Michael J.
The 30-year-old actress and 27-year-old banjoist got married on Saturday in Morocco.
TICKETS Tickets PS12, available from Palas Print Caernarfon and Mudshark Records Bangor While Lindsay Lou and husband/ banjoist Joshua Rilko are a perfect pairing, entertaining dobro maestro Mark Lavengood is a supercharged sidekick and bassman PJ George, as well as being the band's powerfullyimpressive anchor, serves up honey-sweet vocal harmonies.
His bandmate banjoist Winston Marshall, 27, has said that the group are just a bunch of softies.
Banjoist Danny Barnes has been asked to tour with Dave Matthews, the Jeff Austin Band and Robert Earl Keen, who called him "one of the best banjo players in America.
9 Santa Claus is Coming to Town Harry Reser THE earliest known recorded version of the song was by banjoist Harry Reser in 1934.
Winston Marshall, the banjoist and guitarist, has said in interviews that the band was eager to move on following years of touring as an Americana band.
Jazz banjoist Sayer returns to Sarasota with performances March 14 and 15 at the Glenridge Performing Arts Center.
But the band members' geographical origins complicate that assertion when the narrator describes them as "four men and a leader--Rattle Benbow from Galveston; Benbow's buddy, the drummer, from Houston; his banjoist from Birmingham; his cornetist from Atlanta; and the pianist, long-fingered, sissified, a coal-black lad from New Orleans who had brought with him an exaggerated rag-time which he called jazz" (105).
In 1891 banjoist and raconteur Louis "Bebe" Vasnier recorded several titles for The Louisiana Phonograph Company.
Banjoist David Deese: Bluegrass Boy to Briarhopper: an unfinished biography.