banjo

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ban·jo

 (băn′jō)
n. pl. ban·jos or ban·joes
A usually fretted stringed instrument having a narrow neck and a hollow circular body with a covering of plastic or stretched skin on which the bridge rests. The modern American banjo typically has four strings and often a short fifth string plucked with the thumb.

[Earlier banshaw, banjore, banjo, probably of African origin and akin to Kimbundu and Tshiluba mbanza, a plucked stringed instrument (probably also influenced by bandore).]

ban′jo·ist n.

banjo

(ˈbændʒəʊ)
n, pl -jos or -joes
1. (Instruments) a stringed musical instrument with a long neck (usually fretted) and a circular drumlike body overlaid with parchment, plucked with the fingers or a plectrum
2. slang any banjo-shaped object, esp a frying pan
3. (Tools) slang Austral and NZ a long-handled shovel with a wide blade
4. (modifier) banjo-shaped: a banjo clock.
[C18: variant (US Southern pronunciation) of bandore]
ˈbanjoist n

ban•jo

(ˈbæn dʒoʊ)

n., pl. -jos, -joes.
a musical instrument of the guitar family, having a circular body covered in front with tightly stretched parchment and played with the fingers.
[1730–40]
ban′jo•ist, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.banjo - a stringed instrument of the guitar family that has long neck and circular bodybanjo - a stringed instrument of the guitar family that has long neck and circular body
fingerboard - a narrow strip of wood on the neck of some stringed instruments (violin or cello or guitar etc) where the strings are held against the wood with the fingers
stringed instrument - a musical instrument in which taut strings provide the source of sound
Translations
bendžo
banjo
banjo
bendžo
bendzsó
banjó
バンジョー
밴조
bandža
bandžo
bandżobanjo
bendžo
banjo
แบนโจ เครื่องดนตรี
bancobançobanjo
đàn banjô

banjo

[ˈbændʒəʊ] N (banjoes (banjos (pl))) → banjo m

banjo

[ˈbændʒəʊ] [banjoes or banjos] (pl) n (= musical instrument) → banjo m
to play the banjo → jouer du banjo

banjo

n pl <-es or (US) -s> → Banjo nt

banjo

[ˈbændʒəʊ] nbanjo m inv

banjo

(ˈbӕndʒou) plural ˈbanjo(e)s noun
a stringed musical instrument similar to the guitar. He plays the banjo; Play me a tune on the banjo.

banjo

آلة البانْـجو الـموسِيقِيَّة bendžo banjo Banjo μπάντζο banjo banjo banjo bendžo banjo バンジョー 밴조 banjo banjo bandżo banjo банджо banjo แบนโจ เครื่องดนตรี banço đàn banjô 班卓琴
References in classic literature ?
You could tell it was classical, because the banjo players were leaning back and chewing gum; and in New York restaurants only death or a classical speciality can stop banjoists.
Banjoist Winston Marshall added: "We don't want to be part of some Tidal streaming revolution, nor do we want to be Taylor Swift and be anti-it.
Jazz banjoist Sayer returns to Sarasota with performances March 14 and 15 at the Glenridge Performing Arts Center.
Monday's arrests follow the 28 arrests last Wednesday in a blockade led by prominent local musicians including acclaimed banjoist Richie Stearns (Natalie Merchant, The HorseFlies) and Asa Redmond of the Sim Redmond Band.
But the band members' geographical origins complicate that assertion when the narrator describes them as "four men and a leader--Rattle Benbow from Galveston; Benbow's buddy, the drummer, from Houston; his banjoist from Birmingham; his cornetist from Atlanta; and the pianist, long-fingered, sissified, a coal-black lad from New Orleans who had brought with him an exaggerated rag-time which he called jazz" (105).
In 1891 banjoist and raconteur Louis "Bebe" Vasnier recorded several titles for The Louisiana Phonograph Company.
Banjoist David Deese: Bluegrass Boy to Briarhopper: an unfinished biography.
For that matter, neither can Emry Arthur, who, in 1928, made the indelible first recording of "Man of Constant Sorrow"--and who, despite his rudimentary guitar playing, was hired to back up other musicians for their own recordings: "He couldn't reach the chords," the Virginia banjoist Dock Boggs recalled long after his session with Arthur.
Banjoist, composer, and world traveler Jayme Stone presents The Other Side of the Air, a symphonic album of the combined efforts of multiple talented individuals playing everything from the trumpet to stringed instruments to flute, oboe, and more, while Jayme's banjo lends its unique and distinctive melody.
Starting just ahead of that show, in the Northern Rock Foundation Hall at 8pm, is a Bluegrass Supper featuring Vera Van Heeringen, banjoist Dan Walsh and Low Fell's Kentucky Cow Tippers.
The all-day festival, which will have on-site camping that night, will bring in two headliner bands, Bruce Hornsby and Railroad Earth, as well banjoist and guitarist Tony Furtado, Reno-based funk band Jelly Bread, and the Portland-based folk band Shook Twins.
Around 1963, Statman started taking up bluegrass banjo, learning from Julian "Winnie" Winston, recognized then as New York's premier banjoist (Winston would go on to serve a short stint in 1965 with Bill Monroe's Bluegrass Boys).