banjo

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ban·jo

 (băn′jō)
n. pl. ban·jos or ban·joes
A usually fretted stringed instrument having a narrow neck and a hollow circular body with a covering of plastic or stretched skin on which the bridge rests. The modern American banjo typically has four strings and often a short fifth string plucked with the thumb.

[Earlier banshaw, banjore, banjo, probably of African origin and akin to Kimbundu and Tshiluba mbanza, a plucked stringed instrument (probably also influenced by bandore).]

ban′jo·ist n.

banjo

(ˈbændʒəʊ)
n, pl -jos or -joes
1. (Instruments) a stringed musical instrument with a long neck (usually fretted) and a circular drumlike body overlaid with parchment, plucked with the fingers or a plectrum
2. slang any banjo-shaped object, esp a frying pan
3. (Tools) slang Austral and NZ a long-handled shovel with a wide blade
4. (modifier) banjo-shaped: a banjo clock.
[C18: variant (US Southern pronunciation) of bandore]
ˈbanjoist n

ban•jo

(ˈbæn dʒoʊ)

n., pl. -jos, -joes.
a musical instrument of the guitar family, having a circular body covered in front with tightly stretched parchment and played with the fingers.
[1730–40]
ban′jo•ist, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.banjo - a stringed instrument of the guitar family that has long neck and circular bodybanjo - a stringed instrument of the guitar family that has long neck and circular body
fingerboard - a narrow strip of wood on the neck of some stringed instruments (violin or cello or guitar etc) where the strings are held against the wood with the fingers
stringed instrument - a musical instrument in which taut strings provide the source of sound
Translations
bendžo
banjo
banjo
bendžo
bendzsó
banjó
バンジョー
밴조
bandža
bandžo
bandżobanjo
bendžo
banjo
แบนโจ เครื่องดนตรี
bancobançobanjo
đàn banjô

banjo

[ˈbændʒəʊ] N (banjoes (banjos (pl))) → banjo m

banjo

[ˈbændʒəʊ] [banjoes or banjos] (pl) n (= musical instrument) → banjo m
to play the banjo → jouer du banjo

banjo

n pl <-es or (US) -s> → Banjo nt

banjo

[ˈbændʒəʊ] nbanjo m inv

banjo

(ˈbӕndʒou) plural ˈbanjo(e)s noun
a stringed musical instrument similar to the guitar. He plays the banjo; Play me a tune on the banjo.

banjo

آلة البانْـجو الـموسِيقِيَّة bendžo banjo Banjo μπάντζο banjo banjo banjo bendžo banjo バンジョー 밴조 banjo banjo bandżo banjo банджо banjo แบนโจ เครื่องดนตรี banço đàn banjô 班卓琴
References in classic literature ?
All round the coasts of Europe that morning banjos were ringing, voices were bawling and singing, children were playing in the sun, pleasure-boats went to and fro; the common abundant life of the time, unsuspicious of all dangers that gathered darkly against it, flowed on its cheerful aimless way.
Grubb remained regarding his darkened and disheartening shop; he thought of his former landlord and his present landlord, and of the general disgustingness of business in an age which re-echoes to The Bitter Cry of the Middle Class; and then it seemed to him that afar off he heard the twankle, twankle of a banjo, and the voice of a stranded siren singing.
I imagine it would be very difficult to carry a piano over those mountains," said Christie laughingly, to avoid the collateral of the banjo.
The "Shikarris" are a high-caste regiment, and you must be able to do things well-- play a banjo or ride more than a little, or sing, or act--to get on with them.
After this latter proceeding, however, if you do not bring out a banjo and commence to sing, the youthful inhabitants of the neighborhood, who have gathered round in expectation, become disappointed.
He heard in one room a tittering and incontinent, slack laughter; in others the monologue of a scold, the rattling of dice, a lullaby, and one crying dully; above him a banjo tinkled with spirit.
You could tell it was classical, because the banjo players were leaning back and chewing gum; and in New York restaurants only death or a classical speciality can stop banjoists.
You see American Negro slaves made the first real banjos a couple hundred years ago out of old hollowed gourds and opossum skins, I guess.
All in all, the band doesn't seem uncomfortable without the banjos.
The show ends with Duelling Banjos - which actually sees a banjo and acoustic guitar duel - and a version of Pink Floyd's Comfortably Numb, the band having done more than enough to entertain the crowd.
Dueling Banjos'' (from "Deliverance'') was the best and the worse that ever happened to the banjo, Trischka said.
Here it is a sad, vaguely Celtic melody that is finally recorded during Flecks last stop in Mali in a dueling banjos session with Bassekou Kouyate on the ngoni, the banjo of Mali.