baptismal name


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Related to baptismal name: Confirmation name

baptismal name

Chris′tian name`


n.
1. the name given to one at baptism, as distinguished from the family name.
[1540–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.baptismal name - the first name given to Christians at birth or christeningbaptismal name - the first name given to Christians at birth or christening
first name, forename, given name - the name that precedes the surname
References in classic literature ?
as she and her school-fellows knew) was the baptismal name of Miss Jethro.
We have already mentioned the baptismal name of this ancient chief; but in his conversation with Natty, held in the language of the Delawares, he was heard uniformly to call himself Chingachgook, which, interpreted, means the “Great Snake.
It is certain that little Agnes, that was the child's name, a baptismal name, for it was a long time since la Chantefleurie had had any surname--it is certain that that little one was more swathed in ribbons and embroideries than a dauphiness of Dauphiny
Henri; it was my intention to ask her how she came to be possessed of two English baptismal names, Frances and Evans, in addition to her French surname, also whence she derived her good accent.
I do indeed know women in the priesthood who use it--and some who go by "Mother," and others by their baptismal name.
Tatay addressed me by different pet names, and when he called me by my baptismal name it was a warning for me to behave.
That is my baptismal name, just as sacred as their own baptismal names.
My baptismal name (I am letting the cat out of the bag) with its addition at Confirmation is (hold your breath) - Allan Peter Ralph Francis of Assisi de Noronha
Each one is greeted by baptismal name with these words: "Child of the covenant, you are sealed by the Spirit in baptism and marked as Christ's own forever.
Mozart's full baptismal name was Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart.
She asked to be released from her vows, reclaimed her baptismal name, Monika Hellwig, and continued her Catholic University doctoral studies.
Alex Novikoff has produced an elegant and indeed exemplary translation of Jean-Claude Schmitt's study of a now famous little text (Opusculum) purporting to be the description of a twelfth-century German Jew named Judah (or Judas) to Christianity and his spiritual journey to monkhood under the baptismal name Herman.